Tag: second amendment

Laugh More Heal More

Laugh More Heal More

We’ve all heard the old adage that Laughter Is The Best Medicine, but how many of us take this natural prescription regularly?

Things haven’t seemed very funny lately.

Why’s everybody got to be so serious?

In today’s world, even professional comedians can’t laugh at themselves without being called out for being insensitive to someone’s feelings. ​We humans are taught to believe that we are all very different from one another, but there is scientific evidence that shows that collective human DNA is 99.9% identical. That’s not what you hear from the mail in ancestry kits, is it?

This fact is not meant to diminish or take away from our individual and family history. We are who we are based on our parents, and their parents, and so on. Some of us have straight hair and wish we had curls, just like some of us are tall and slim while wishing we were petite and curvy. Our skin may be pink and ruddy, or warm like cocoa. These are factors that are out of our control, but they are ours, and if you’re blessed with parents who loved each other, your traits are genetic gifts of love. If we look at ourselves and devalue what we see, based on what society tells us we should see, we will never be happy. Maybe if we begin to accept that we really all are quite similar, then just maybe we can start honoring not only ourselves, but also accepting each other.

In the southern neighborhood where I grew up, where everyone’s skin tone varied, we all played together anyway. Skin color was a non issue. What did matter though, was how good you could make mud pies, explore the woods, and ride a bike. Many lifetime friendships were formed in my community.

As someone who appreciates wise words of wisdom, my grandmother once said to me,

“You must learn about where someone comes from in order to understand how to walk with them.”

At the time, I didn’t fully comprehend the gravity of that statement, but recently I’ve come to realize what she meant.

What if we encourage each other to not only walk together physically, but proverably? How could that change us, and the world in which we live? Before we can fully grasp where we are in this country today, we must first take a hard look at the history of how we, the human race, have treated each other.

When people are taught only one way to do things, it’s not easy to adapt to a different way. It often takes time, and a different skill set to do things a new way. Most of us don’t want to do that. We like to do things the way we like to do things. Look how long it took us to get beyond the tea cupping grip in shooting. Heck, people are still teaching something that gives no support or stability to a shot. Those who don’t step outside of the tea cupping box will never know if their control or accuracy will improve. But if it did improve, that could open a whole new world.

In order for us to successfully work together as a team, there are certain elements that have to be in place, such as kindness, empathy, and mutual respect. Why is it that we can do this to make our salary paying jobs flow, but not when we step out of that arena?

Perhaps if we seriously look inward and examine what is stopping us from being able to step outside of our world, and what we hold closely, we could see the 30,000 foot view. Who knows, We just might find some like minded people on the outside of our tea cupping box to walk with.

Wouldn’t it be cool If we were the conduit to bringing some of the much needed healing that needs to happen in our broken world.

By bringing unity in the 2A community, We all are the sum of our parts.

Being a catalyst for positive change requires us to use our time, GOD given talents and energy to move forward. There’s a lot of people right now who are frightened, hurting, and worried about so much. We may be one of them, but I truly believe that the key to healing begins by listening with both our hearts and ears. It is then, that GOD’S grace will be revealed to us, and the message will be loud and clear. Be the positive change.

Papas Got A Brand New Bag

Papas Got A Brand New Bag

A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it annoys enough people to make it worth it.

MARYLAND, USA Civil rights activist, firearms instructor and podcaster known as the Black Man With A Gun ™ retires with over six hundred available episodes. Rev. Kenn Blanchard, also a Christian pastor has decided to pass the torch of gun rights advocacy to the next generation of social media influencers that have grown exponentially on the internet over the past five years.

The Black Man With A Gun persona emerged in 1999 with the release of the website of the same name announcing the self-published book of the same name in 2000. It was an ominous time to be pro-gun. There was a tragedy at a school named Columbine. Some were worried about the Apocalypse and Y2K.

black Man with a gun first edition

Oprah Winfrey had a TV show and a Book Club that was making stars out of hacks at the time. Blanchard was elated when someone from her team requested a copy of his book for review.

“All I wanted to be is a resource for saving lives in the community. I could be the go-to guy to stop accidents in the homes, protect single mothers; and help boys become men.”

That didn’t happen.

Blanchard did begin speaking around the country to promote his book which with the website made him look authoritative. Websites were not common in 2001 unless you have a lot of resources. This website was created by a woman with a PhD that was a friend of a friend.

It was bigger than the NRA’s at the time. The Libertarian Party of Maryland liked Blanchard so much that they wanted him for a gubernatorial candidate.

Several websites around the country put his face and info on their websites. Some claimed him as a conservative, some a progressive liberal and even some a Black Nationalist.

African American themed book stores were the thing and they didn’t want to sell my book.

They said it didn’t promote the kind of values they wanted to reflect in their store. I thought it was odd though that a book about responsible gun ownership would be rebuffed while the books with the best placement in the store were about pimps, prostitutes and street hustlers. A book called “Monster,” the autobiography of a gang member had the most prominent spot in the window at the time.

I’ve been there and done that.
I got the NRA’s Eddie Eagle to do the one and only sold out appearance at an African American event in Washington, DC of 10,000 people. I received a Civil Rights Award from the NRA that got me a standing ovation at an Annual meeting in Phoenix, AZ.

Before the web presence, I was just as busy. I created a national gun club for African Americans called the Tenth Cavalry Gun in 1992. There are even more details on my bio page at http://kennblanchard.com/about

 

Tenth Cavalry at the new NRA range in 1992

May I continue?

I started the Urban Shooter Podcast after being interviewed by Mark Vanderberg on his podcast back in 2007 called Gun Rights Radio. Mark sparked my love of Old Time radio and the desire to be on terrestrial radio since a teen.

I tried everything on that podcast. We had a weekly audio drama called Zombie Strike! That some loved and some hated. We had a couple of burgeoning comedians. I have interviewed over 200 influential guests. And some not so. I stumbled, mumbled and sang to my heart’s content. I told stories and shared African American history with an audience I didn’t know would care. And I loved them for it. I told them my life, and they shared my time and experiences as the “pastor of patriots, pistoleros, and Paladins.”

The podcast helped me learn and focus my craft of speaking, preaching and reaching people. It helped me learn about myself.

The desire to retire from the gun rights movement grew after the 2019 Gun Rights Policy Conference in Arizona. I got a chance to see the heirs of my struggle. There are a handful of activist that are doing it right. They don’t have to chase advertisers or sponsors like I did. They have thousands of followers off the break.

And then there was the successful 2 A Rally in Washington DC. 2000 of my closest friends put on a major event without the usual foolishness. In spite of the naysayers it happened. This event again gave me the “warm and fuzzy” that I could depart this space and go on to other things.

I was tired of trying to convince others that I was still valuable. I was tired of watching people with no credibility or integrity –flourish. I was tired of re-introducing myself. I was tired of defending what I was doing to my wife, churches and a long list of connections.

I wanted to go out before I said something that got me into trouble. They old guys in the balcony on the Muppet Show were about to get a third.

Right after I announced my “retirement” my computer gave up the ghost. It was apropos.

I am not finished though.
My voice and passion for others is stronger. I plan to continue to podcast and write.

On guns, I am still pro-rights, pro-guns. I care more about the gun owner than the brand, model or reissue of a firearm.

I love the brother or sister that also cares about this nation, their communities and family enough to be a citizen.

For thirty years I have fought for the rights of gun owners of all colors, and categories. I am a part of the family that cares for and encourages the growth or development of someone or something.

One of my biggest regrets is not knowing how to use the ever changing search engine optimization. What I plan to do is to become a better storyteller that can share wisdom, good times and inspiration. I’m taking the name from an Old World French and African class of traveling poets, musicians, and storytellers that maintained a tradition of oral history called griots.

This new podcast will speak to and about elements of American history, culture, that help us do better. There will definitely be some gun stuff there.

The Second Amendment is so important to our nation, it’s in the Bill of Rights.
The American Grio is coming. I am hoping you’ll come along for the ride.

It’s everything that is you and me.

 

 

Check out these podcast:  Black Man With A Gun Show ,  Speak Life church , and  Indian Motorcycle radio  The Books, Kenn has written.
Grandmas Gun

Grandmas Gun

My maternal grandmother introduced me to the history of the Second Amendment and busted the myth of gun control. Her annual ritual of celebratory gun fire gave me the true origin of Watch Night.

Grandma was not a gun rights advocate, or a politician. She and my ailing grandfather lived in poverty about 500 yards from the Virginia border of North Carolina on a small farm. Historically it was the same location that Nat Turner ran through and hid after becoming a fugitive for fighting slavery and leading a four-day rebellion of both enslaved and free black people in Southampton County, Virginia, in 1831. It was remote, rural and poor.

Grandmas was the orphanage for our family. Her barn was the storehouse for baby items, and furniture. Instead of selling stuff, our families brought it here if it could be reused by a new parent, newlywed or member of the family needing to start out. Except for the baby cribs, most of it was never reused. It was just junk.

My grandparents raised hogs, chickens, ducks, and rabbits and had a garden. Only two neighbors. The closest was 500 yards down the road on one side. The other was the hunting lodge a mile in the other direction.

No indoor toilets, (we had an outhouse and chamber pots) no showers, drafty in the winter, blazing hot in the summers, it was going back in time.

My grandfather suffered a stroke early in my life and walked with a cane. He was slightly disabled, but still worked the farm when able, and then there was grandma who took care of us all.

It was the best time of my life.

A small pond / swamp also was connected to the property which was my playground growing up. Dish and bathwater were dumped into this place. There was a grapevine at the end of the property that was the home of bees, and all manner of creeping things.

It was in this home that I first saw my grandmother use the shotgun that sat behind the wood burning stove in the kitchen all my life.

My understanding of the Second Amendment, and gun ownership began with that shotgun. It was naturally camouflaged by rust, age and dirt. It was probably a Sears Roebuck 12-gauge 101 shotgun for the collectors.

It was that shotgun that became the base of my pro-gun stance. For people that are ignorant about guns that was what I was exposed to because of my grandmother. It was unlocked, loaded and accessible gun in a kitchen, with 3-10 grandchildren in the house at any time. No accidents, no fear of it. We respected our grandparents. We respected their home, rules and gun.

One summer that I spent there as a child amped up my appreciation of arms and my grandmother. While playing near the swamp, a four foot water moccasin came out of the water to dry itself and warm up. I was just standing there when it came out of the water. Water moccasins are an aggressive species of poisonous snake also known as the Cottonmouth. When it found its spot on the bank, it didn’t want any crap from a young kid like me. It hissed, bared its fangs and stood up to make itself look bigger.

It worked because it scared the crap out of me. I screamed. SNAKE! Grandma- Snake! It was then that I saw the marksmanship of my grandmother.

Except for New Year’s, which I will share with you next, I didn’t know if my grandmother could use the gun. I don’t remember my age but I know when she came to the screen door and saw the snake about six feet away from me, she went into mama bear mode.

“What do you want boy” she said looking through the screen door on the back porch. She saw me, she saw the snake and went back in the house.

Grandma I yelled again, not wanting to be left alone. I didn’t know she saw my predicament.

She came back in seconds. I was a first relieved and then I got worried. She had that old shotgun and started walking toward me.

The first thing I thought of was, she is old. What if she can’t shoot? She ain’t the Rifleman. She might shoot me. But that is how she walked. Like the rifleman straight at me.

No grandma no I said quietly,

Steadily walking toward me…

She mounted the shotgun into her shoulder like a soldier, looking down the barrel and without warning fired a shot which expertly disintegrated the black snake. Parts of which went back into the swamp.

The noise of the shotgun made me jump. After I looked at where the snake should have been all I saw was the back of grandma going back into the house, going back to whatever grandmas do, not even phased or concerned.

I just stood there, mouth opened, still in shock from the whole event. I wasn’t shot, she kept me from being bit, she had fired an old shotgun from what I realized today was a good distance on the move.

YAY Grandma!

The second time I saw the shotgun move from behind the stove was during hunting season. It was a cold morning, during my Christmas break and a truck load of white men drove onto the farm unannounced. By the time a couple of them approached the outer door, Grandma had the shotgun in hand as she opened the door to greet them. They never knew it but she was armed.

With practiced “sweetness” she answered the door, ready to defend us if necessary. The white men were just as polite and apologized for the interruption and offered “Ms Mary” some venison should they be lucky today. It was in exchanges like that I saw examples of how an armed society was a polite society. I think that is a podcast somewhere.

And then finally the annual event that reminds me of my grandma’s shotgun was watch night otherwise known as New Year’s Eve.

For some people making noise, and popping corks is the extent of celebrating the New Years’ revelry but I want to share with you what it meant to an African American woman born before women were allowed to vote, the Titanic sank, and during the time when people of color were discouraged from voting. Someone who was a child during the conflict of WWI, and Virginia’s alcohol prohibition.

My great grandparents where the first generation to celebrate the experience what was first called Freedoms Eve.

You see, New Year’s Eve used to be a special occasion in African American culture. Celebratory gunfire meant more than noise making. Freed men owned guns, slaves did not.

Let’s go back to December 31, 1862. After the Union Army was victorious at the Battle of Antietam on September 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued a preliminary proclamation that declared that all slaves in “any state or designated part of a state . . . In rebellion against the United States shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free.” Many blacks in the North and South as well as both free and enslaved blacks anxiously waited for Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation to become effective on January 1, 1863.

Wide eyed with anticipation, many African Americans dared not sleep throughout the late night hours because they wanted to watch “the night turn into a new dawn.” As they watched, many slaves reflected on their hardships and toils, mourned the memory of their ancestors and loved ones who died in slavery, and spent time thanking and praised God for allowing them and their descendants to watch the night of captivity pass.

The chains of poverty, racism, and discrimination have acted as constricting shackles for many African Americans throughout the course of the century following emancipation. Being only quasi-free and given the illusion of equality, many African Americans derived hope from the well spring of their faith as they struggled for the realization of God’s perfect will for true liberation and justice

But this wasn’t universal. Many African Americans want “to distance themselves from the more painful and degrading aspect of the race’s collective past,” as they feel that celebrating emancipation kept the memory of slavery alive. After 1870, and even continuing into the twentieth century, many African Americans advocated halting Freedom Day commemorations. It is rarely even mentioned in church services.

Shooting a gun wasn’t allowed for many of us. We have culturally added prohibitions on ourselves to prevent our children from being lynched, or jailed. This self-inflicted behavior is from the Black Codes. The first gun control law in Virginia was circa 1639 where the General Assembly of Virginia specifically excludes blacks from the requirement of possessing arms.

Black codes were restrictive laws designed to limit the freedom of African Americans and ensure their availability as a cheap labor force after slavery was abolished during the Civil War. Though the Union victory had given some 4 million slaves their freedom, the question of freed blacks’ status in the postwar South was still very much unresolved. Under black codes, many states required blacks to sign yearly labor contracts; if they refused, they risked being arrested, fined and forced into unpaid labor. Outrage over black codes helped undermine support for President Andrew Johnson and the Republican Party.

The end of slavery in 1865 did not eliminate the problems of racist gun control laws; the various Black Codes adopted after the Civil War required blacks to obtain a license before carrying or possessing firearms or Bowie knives; these are sufficiently well-known that any reasonably complete history of the Reconstruction period mentions them. These restrictive gun laws played a part in the efforts of the Republicans to get the Fourteenth Amendment ratified, because it was difficult for domestic terrorist aka night riders (KKK) to generate the correct level of terror in a victim who was returning fire. It does appear, however, that the requirement to treat blacks and whites equally before the law led to the adoption of restrictive firearms laws in the South that were equal in the letter of the law, but unequally enforced.

High Court rules has no power to stop KKK members from disarming blacks. In United States v. Cruikshank, 92 U.S. at 548-59 (1875) A member of the KKK, Cruikshank had been charged with violating the rights of two black men to peaceably assemble and to bear arms. The U.S. Supreme Court held that the federal government had no power to protect citizens against private action (not committed by federal or state government authorities) that deprived them of their constitutional rights under the 14th Amendment. The Court held that for protection against private criminal action, individuals are required to look to state governments. “The doctrine in Cruikshank, that blacks would have to look to state government for protection against criminal conspiracies gave the green light to private forces, often with the assistance of state and local governments, that sought to subjugate the former slaves and their descendants… With the protective arm of the federal government withdrawn, protection of black lives and property was left to largely hostile state governments.” (GLJ, p. 348.)

When I was a kid, all my heroes had guns. Around Christmas time that was all I wanted. All the popular TV shows had guys with trademarked guns. Cowboys, spies, cops, cartoons, and soldiers all had cool guns.

Oh yeah and my grandma.

Check out these podcast:  Black Man With A Gun Show ,  Speak Life church , and  Indian Motorcycle radio  The Books, Kenn has written.
Kevin Dixie of No Other Choice Firearms Training

Kevin Dixie of No Other Choice Firearms Training

Back in November 2017, my patient co-host Michael J. Woodland, interviewed St. Louis, MO firearms trainer and holistic community activist Kevin Dixie. I apologize in advance for the lateness and the quality of the show. I just got a chance to process the audio and present it this week for the Black Man With A Gun Show Podcast. (For the record don’t use a Bluetooth device for an interview) And there are some sounds I couldn’t get rid of when a little girl does a drive by but please stick with it. I did the best I could…

Founder of NOC firearms training, NoOtherChoice.net, Kevin Dixie is awesome. He is not talking to the choir for more FaceTime. He is the real deal. The audio starts off a little rough but try to stay with it because it is gold. Aiming for the Truth conference coming. He explains it.

He is doing this for sure not for show!

Family first, how to talk to people about the Second Amendment, empowering, law abiding, attacking misconceptions, for fatherhood. A mentor in the community. Former LEO. A good guy with a gun. A Black Man With A Gun.

Andrew Branca with a VA case in the Law of Self Defense feature at the end. The show is almost 60 minutes this week.

Don’t forget we have a free app in IOS and Android for this podcast.

https://USCCA.blackmanwithagun.com

https://crossbreedholsters.com

https://patreon.com/blackmanwithagun

www.blackmanwithagun.com

speaklifechurch.net

 

thanks Michael J. Woodland 

Check out these podcast:  Black Man With A Gun Show ,  Speak Life church , and  Indian Motorcycle radio  The Books, Kenn has written.

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