NRA and Divergent Thoughts

There are conflicted accounts on how well or how bad things are in the National Rifle Association.

Those that want it’s demise cheer at the ambiguity, infighting and mess it has become accustomed to.  I am connected to those inside and those that used to be.  Where do we go from here?  Here are two post I hijacked from articles sent to me.  One was sent to me from former NRA lobbyist Richard Feldman and the second one is from one of the list I am on ala Jeff Knox.

 

N.R.A. Sues Contractor Behind NRATV

It’s the N.R.A. versus NRATV.

The National Rifle Association sued one of its largest and most enduring contractors late last week and raised concerns about the contractor’s relationship to the association’s own president, Oliver North, in a stunning breach within the normally buttoned-up organization.

The suit was filed late Friday by the N.R.A. in Virginia, where it is based, against Ackerman McQueen, the Oklahoma ad firm that operates NRATV, the group’s incendiary online media arm. The suit asserts that Ackerman has concealed details from the N.R.A. about how the company is spending the roughly $40 million that it and its affiliates receive annually from the association.

The suit creates uncertainty about Mr. North’s future at the organization. And it leaves the future of NRATV in doubt, given the new acrimony in the Ackerman relationship.

Since Ackerman created NRATV in 2016, it has often been “perceived by the public as the voice of the N.R.A.,” according to the rifle association’s complaint. It has also taken on an apocalyptic tone, warning of race wars, calling for a march on the Federal Bureau of Investigation and portraying the talking trains in the children’s show “Thomas & Friends” in Ku Klux Klan hoods.

The New York Times reported this year that two prominent N.R.A. board members were among those voicing alarm inside the association that NRATV was often straying beyond gun rights. The Times article also revealed that Ackerman had a previously undisclosed financial relationship with Mr. North.

The association is untangling broader problems as well, including a legal fight in New York with the administration of Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo over an insurance program the N.R.A. offers to gun owners. The new state attorney general, Letitia James, has also repeatedly threatened to investigate the tax-exempt status of the organization, which was incorporated in New York.

Facing this regulatory backdrop, the association began a review of its financial relationships with hundreds of vendors in August to ensure that it was in compliance with best practices.

The N.R.A. complaint alleges that Ackerman refused to turn over a number of financial records, including those detailing out-of-pocket expenses “that lacked meaningful documentation of N.R.A. approvals, receipts or other support.” The association also wants documents that it says could allay its concern that it was being invoiced for the full salaries of Ackerman employees who also did work for other Ackerman clients. In addition, the complaint alleges that Ackerman has refused to provide data about NRATV’s unique visitors and various other performance measures.

“The N.R.A.’s patience has run out,” the suit says.

Ackerman, in a statement, sharply disputed the contentions in the lawsuit, whose filing was earlier reported by The Wall Street Journal.

“During a three-week review, an N.R.A. forensic auditing firm received every single piece of information they [the N.R.A.] requested,” the statement said. “Further, the N.R.A. has had consistent access to any and all documents regarding NRATV analytics. Despite the representation set forth in their lawsuit, the N.R.A. had the personnel contract they claim AM withheld last week before they filed their lawsuit.”

The complaint details a peculiar standoff with Ackerman over Mr. North, who took over as president last year. The N.R.A. claims it was aware that Mr. North had a contract to act as the host of a web series for Ackerman, but that Ackerman has refused to provide a copy of the contract for nearly six months. Additionally, Mr. North’s counsel told the N.R.A. that “he could only disclose a copy of the contract” if Ackerman said he could, the suit says.

Subsequently, Ackerman allowed the N.R.A.’s general counsel to view the contract but not keep a copy; the viewing added to N.R.A. concerns that it had not previously received an accurate summary of the document. The association was also concerned that Mr. North’s relationship to Ackerman could “supersede his duties to the N.R.A.”

A standoff persists over additional details about the relationship, according to the complaint.

The lawsuit is further complicated by family ties. The N.R.A.’s outside lawyer, William A. Brewer III, is the son-in-law of Angus McQueen, a co-chief executive of Ackerman, and the brother-in-law of Revan McQueen, its chief executive. Ackerman called the relationships an “irreconcilable conflict of interest” and said some kind of family dispute “pervades the Brewer firm’s dealings with Ackerman McQueen.”

Travis Carter, a spokesman for Mr. Brewer’s law firm, said “the familial relationship” had “no bearing whatsoever on the N.R.A.’s litigation strategy.” He added, “Any suggestion to the contrary is contrived and a red herring.”

The suit culminates the fracturing of a more than three-decade relationship between Ackerman and the N.R.A., going back to the shaping of such memorable lines as Charlton Heston’s proclaiming that his gun would have to be pried “from my cold, dead hands.” Wayne LaPierre, the longtime chief executive of the N.R.A., had previously been a steadfast champion of the Ackerman relationship.

“I think it says something about Wayne’s character, even though he’s had a long-term working business relationship with a vendor, he’s willing to do what is right and necessary for the N.R.A. and its members,” said Todd Rathner, a board member of the rifle association.

Joel Friedman, another board member, said he was dismayed that the documents had not been turned over.

“It leaves you questioning, and you can come up with all these potential different scenarios as to why, but none of them are good,” he said.

“My mind goes to: Are they overcharging us? That’s one,” he added. “Two, are there things charged to us that were not part of the contract? Then, No. 3, has there been a misallocation of personnel?”

Can you spell “FOOD FIGHT”?

And now from Jeff Knox

Practical Steps Toward Improving the NRA

(February 5, 2019) Over the years, I have often been pretty critical of the NRA and its leadership team. Even though I try to make a point of expressing my support for the organization and its mission, there are always some who see my criticism as an attack, and an attempt to tear down the organization. In this column, rather than simply pointing at the flaws and failures of the association, I want to address some practical and reasonable solutions and expectations.

It is unreasonable and unrealistic to think that a 147-year old, $300 million plus, per year organization, with an elected board of 76 deeply entrenched directors, would or could suddenly shift course and completely revamp the way they do business. Even the famous Cincinnati Revolt in 1977, which was a ground-shaking event, only resulted in only minor changes in the long-term operations of the organization – and years of wrangling for power and control. Another result of the Cincinnati Revolt, was the inevitable restructuring of the rules to make sure that nothing like it could ever happen again. That started with the revolutionaries, putting up defenses against a counter-revolution, and then was continued by the “Old Guard” as they slowly regained power. Today, virtually all of the reforms of Cincinnati have been reversed or modified beyond recognition.

So, with all of the problems that the NRA is currently facing: A $30 million deficit, declining revenue and membership numbers, legal assaults and much frustration over their Carry Guard insurance and training program, accusations of illegal campaign spending, and suggestions of improper dealings with Russian agents, and a large segment of the membership upset over what they see as capitulation on core issues… What would be realistic expectations for reforms at NRA?

To begin with, the Board of Directors needs to establish very clear guidance to the Executive Vice President and staff to ensure that every communication, every policy, every strategy, and anything else that comes out of the organization is consistent with the core values and principles of the association and the Second Amendment. This should be backed up by an oversight subcommittee of the Board, composed of Second Amendment purists who will always place principles over politics. Too often, it seems that the political operatives are driving the boat, leaving principles behind in the name of pragmatism. Closer oversight from some purists on the Board would go a long way toward solving this problem.

Next, the Board must review the audit processes that should be in place to ensure full compliance with all state and federal fundraising and political spending laws and regulations. Everyone at NRA should be very aware that everything they do will be scrutinized by regulators, reporters, and political operatives looking for any irregularity or impropriety. With that awareness, it is totally inexcusable that there should be even the slightest hint or appearance of the organization straying from the straight and narrow. We know that accusations will always be thrown at us, so we must be sure that we are absolutely scrupulous and beyond reproach in all of our dealings.

Stories that the NRA accepted large donations from Russian citizens, and then used that money to support a presidential candidate, should be easy to refute. Accusations that the NRA used the same political advertising agencies as candidates they supported – suggesting that they were coordinating independent expenditures with those campaigns – should never even come up, and if they did, NRA should be able to very quickly disprove such accusations, but so far, they have refused to even answer any questions about the matter.

The roll-out of a major new program like NRA Carry Guard should be preceded by thorough examination of the insurance and solicitation laws of every state, to ensure that there would be no conflicts or compliance issues, but that apparently didn’t happen with Carry Guard. There should also have been in-depth discussion with the Training Division and the Board committee that oversees training, along with key training counselors around the country, before such a major training initiative was introduced, but again, that apparently didn’t happen. This has resulted in fines and lawsuits from Insurance Commissioners in several states, and confusion and anger among NRA Instructors. Where was the due diligence that would have avoided these problems? The Board must institute policies and procedures to make sure such mistakes and “bad optics” don’t recur, and those responsible for the blunders must be held accountable.

Next, the Board needs to review all vendor agreements, eliminate any unnecessary programs, and begin transitioning as much as possible back in-house. Currently, the NRA pays over $40 million a year to one PR and Advertising company. They also pay a telemarketing firm something in the neighborhood of $30 million a year, and they list four separate companies just to “advise” them on fundraising, at a total of over $3 million per year – just for advice!

Then there is the issue of executive compensation. While it is not unusual for executives in some major non-profit corporations – such as the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts or the Guggenheim Museum – to receive compensation in excess of $1 million dollars per year, these are typically professional executives who could earn such compensation at any number of similar organizations, and are funded by wealthy patrons and huge endowments. Such is not the case with Wayne LaPierre and Chris Cox. They rose to their current positions via internal political maneuvering and being in the right place at the right time. Both would be hard-pressed to find employment in the $200 to $300k range as senior lobbyists in a DC firm, and wouldn’t even be considered for any sort of senior management positions.

The Board should review all executive compensation packages and bring them down to more reasonable levels. NRA executives should not be expected to work for free, but it is simply not right to be paying LaPierre almost a million and a half dollars per year while begging hard-working NRA members for $20 contributions.

The steps suggested here are not dramatic. They would not jeopardize the stability of the organization or damage its political clout in any way, nor would they be costly or difficult. On the contrary, these steps would stabilize the NRA, refocus it on its core missions, establish proper and long-lacking Board oversight of operations, save money, reduce costly mistakes, and restore the faith of members and former members in the NRA’s mission and leadership. These are all things that the NRA Board should have been doing all along, and needs to do now.

But instead of taking these reasonable, rational steps to improve and strengthen the NRA, scuttlebutt inside the organization suggests that the leadership is going to try to “solve” the problems by creating a for-profit entity, out from under the NRA non-profit umbrella and less accessible to the prying eyes of government regulators, nosy reporters, and “disgruntled members” like me. In other words, rather than fixing the problems, they are going to try and hide them from view.

Let’s hope the rumors aren’t true, and that the NRA Board of Directors has the will and integrity to do what needs to be done.

What do you think?

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Keeping you out of Jail

This week on the podcast, Kenn interviews John Pierce, Esq. a longtime friend, gun rights activist and now attorney that is strong in support of the Second Amendment for his clients.

This Virginia based lawyer peels the legal “onion” of how to restore your gun rights if you have a felony. He answers the questions about what to do if you have a history in another state and are trying to clear your name so that you can exercise your right to self-defense. I am trying to keep you out of jail.

If you are going through a ugly divorce, involved in a domestic violence case, use a firearm at work, John also breaks down some stuff you should know about the Lautenberg Amendment.

How to defend yourself against false allegations.

Suicide awareness week is approaching and Michael and I talk about the signs that someone is considering it.

CP Time – Colored People’s Time is also discussed.

Michael J. Woodland reviews the JP4 Tactical Relic holster.

 

New fiction books takes you into the world of werewolves, the Blues and the supernatural. Check them out at http://Kennblanchard.com

This week is packed with information as I try to make sure this is the responsible gun owners podcast.

The Law Office of John Pierce, Esq.
Office: (276) 206-9615
John@JohnPierceEsq.com

http://Marylandshallissue.com
http://ammo.com/blackmanwithagun
http://Crossbreedholsters.com
http://Uscca.blackmanwithagun.com

Thank you to our awesome supporters

 

 

If you like the podcast, download the free app for it on IOS at http://BlackManWithAGun.org also available in Google Play for Android. You can support this podcast at http://patreon.com/blackmanwithagun

Why We Love History (and You Should Too!)

Kenn Blanchard c.1999 from african american arms and instruction, inc.

Podcast 576

 

  1. A look back over the past 25 years as a gun rights activist and a company I started called African American Arms & Instruction, Inc. (A3i).
  2. Michael reviews some tactical pants.
  3. Shoot don’t Shoot scenario.

 

How long have you been my friend?

Did we meet in person when I started training security guards in 1987? Did we meet at the Radio One Black family reunion on the mall in Washington, DC back in 1992? We introduced the NRA’s Eddie Eagle to the city and sold out of brochures and stuff. Did we meet in Baltimore City when I gave a safety talk and show and tell in the park at a daycare center and to the cub scouts?
Thank you for following this podcast and blog. You are the reason I do this. You have been the positive result from hours of time and thousands of dollars spent. It’s been quite a journey with you. We’ve met at NRA annual meetings, at Gun Rights Policy Conferences, SHOT show, on the range, on the radio, and now on social media. Some folks have actually seen me preaching at the church in Washington, DC. You have seen me on stage. Where you at the NRA Annual meeting when Marion Hammer, Tanya Metaska and Charlton Heston gave me a civil rights award?

Did we meet at the state house in Richmond, VA with the testimony for the change of concealed carry laws? Did we meet in Austin, Texas when I was on the hot seat with Attorney Royce West? Did you hear me in South Carolina lobbying that councilmen that was also a Baptist preacher? Do you remember when I spoke in Lansing, Michigan to reform concealed carry laws? Do you remember the bunch of time in Annapolis, Maryland when we tried our best to change the minds of the backwards thinking politicians there? Remember that time, the Brady Campaign pimped the mothers of gang violence in? Were we on the steps of Madison, Wisconsin as the snowflakes fell. The Law Enforcement Alliance of America was big back then.

Do you remember when your friend and brother from another mother was quoted in the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Washington Times, and Washington Business Journal? Did you see Larry Elders, “Michael and Me ” back in 2004? You should go on Amazon.com and see if it is there. I was hyped on that one. If you are from South Africa, Australia, Great Britain, Canada, or Papua New Guinea did we connect after Miriam Margolyes had me on her documentary the BBC’s “Dickens in America; My American Journey” (2004).

Do you remember when I was on TV-One’s, “Sharp Talk with Rev. Al Sharpton” (2007) defending the right to keep and bear arms nationally? That was unreal.
This is all before social media really. For most folks though, I think you found me on the podcast. The Urban Shooter that I started in 2007. Was that it?
Did we meet in 2014 when I shared a stage with the now president of the United States in Albany, NY? Did we meet when I spoke in Atlanta, GA for the Georgia Gun owners or in Phoenix, AZ for AZCDL.org.

I have been there, tried this and that, and failed at more things that you can shake a stick at. I had a cool outdoor internet radio show called Blanchard Outdoors that was doing good till we got comfortable. I’ll share that story offline when we meet if you remember to ask me. It has been in an incredible ride.

How did it start?

After four years of qualifying truck drivers, polygraphers, field agents, and police officers for the CIA, for armed duty I had learned more about firearms than anyone in my family. We were hunters and fisherman but owning a firearm for self-defense, carrying one legally concealed, traveling, storing, and using one defensively was not even discussed. When I was moved to work with covert operators, analyst and foreign agents, my life changed. I started to learn what is referred to as “tradecraft.” I found out that I was a knuckle dragger among my Ivy-league peers that would be traveling to the exotic places that I had only seen in James Bond movies. The strange thing was that these folks had little street knowledge and they would be going to the mean streets of capital cities around the world. They couldn’t make it in Newark but they were going to Nepal. They couldn’t survive in LA but were on their way to La Paz.

Having spent a few years in the Marines Embassy program abroad, I started to put some of my past experiences together with what these new students might need versus what they were being taught. My initiative was appreciated and ego stroked. I became a trainer of folks going to hostile environments more often and started traveling to our range facility so much I thought they were going to make me a permanent member of the place. It was something I wanted actually. It was too early for that. That position came later and was awarded to someone else.

I created a few programs that are still in use in the government. Feeling used and unappreciated I thought about what it would be like to create a firearm safety business to train law enforcement, security and ordinary citizens in concealed carry, home safety and do what hasn’t been done to prevent accidents in the homes of urban Americans.

This was 1990. MC Hammer is on the radio .

It was before George Foreman was selling grills. He is still boxing and knocks out a guy named Cooney. The Major of Washington DC is arrested in drug sting. Nelson Mandela is freed after 27 years of imprisonment in South Africa. Mike Tyson is knocked out. And I was sent overseas to protect a family from a guerilla army.

When I returned I was given additional training and decided to change my line of work. It was in 1991 that I created African American Arms & Instruction, Inc. I pitched the idea to three of my friends on the way back from training one afternoon and two of the three decided to start it. We didn’t have a template, or a good business plan. We didn’t have a business or marketing background. This was before the internet was a staple in every household and cell phone. It was before Facebook, Instagram and Linked-in.

Starting at ranges around the Maryland and Northern Virginia area I learned that gun control had taken a toll on my potential audience. The only ones that wanted my services were single mothers of black boys wanting “a man” to teach them and their boys responsible gun ownership, two parent households of black nationalists, followers of Garvey, the Nation of Islam, and those of the anarchist mindset. Security officers looking to get re-qualified for armed duty after failing their shooting days at the range, just wanted to pay me for my signature. They didn’t want to learn officer survival, safety or a better way to shoot and qualify. They were used to paying their “instructors” to certify them.
I had major problems with all of it. I was American by birth. My ancestors were enslaved in this land. I was free. I have served my country and was still serving it. I am nobody’s victim. I have been wronged in my lifetime. I have faced racism. I have been in presence of racist black, white and yellow and brown. I know the real thing. I don’t blame anyone for the color of their skin but will judge them on the content of their character. I have a problem with apathy, willful ignorance, and hate. I threw everything into making my business grow as I could in the early nineties. I did it to the point of bankruptcy. I learned the character of my new wife at the time. She was willing to stick by me, though I didn’t deserve it.

I was about to give up, when I found out that the NRA was having a board of directors meeting in a nearby hotel in Arlington, VA. I thought I’d crash the party and see what the good old boys are doing. In my mind, they would be holding Pabst blue ribbon beers, talking to congressmen, dressed in bib overalls, blue jeans, and orange hunting outfits. I didn’t know anything about the NRA in 1991. The CIA had shielded me from them whenever we trained. If a class was sponsored by one of their trainers or one of our guys had attended the train the trainer program, the political view point of the NRA was always given with a disclaimer. I didn’t know what my political view point was at that time. I was a hammer of the US Government and I didn’t care who was in office.

When I entered the ballroom, I soon found out three things. The first was that I was the only person in the room with a tuxedo or dark suit. The second was the only other black guy in the room was Roy Innis, not counting the wait staff. He nodded to me but didn’t approach me. The third thing I realized was that I had stereotyped the NRA and had made the same “you guys like to dance, eat watermelon, love fired chicken and drink grape Kool-aid,” kinda thing.

Three old white guys in tuxedos came over, introduced themselves and ignited my passion for history, and gun rights activism. They cautioned me to avoid the media in the room, so that I wouldn’t come off looking like a “Bubba.” They piqued my interest in history by quoting bits of history I had never heard. I was a proud, intelligent black man, how are you going to tell me about parts of black history that I don’t know?

I couldn’t wait to ask my elders, and do my own research. When I found out that they were right, I was ashamed and glad at the same time. What else have I been wrong about in life? It was an awakening to me. I became self-actualized. Slowly through the next few years of speaking engagements, travel, study, and being in the company of state and federal law makers I changed.

Abraham Maslow has a pyramid of Self Actualization I learned in Psychology 101. I actually figured what that was when I became self-actualized. I started to be ok with knowing that I didn’t know everything. I started to accept myself as I was. I stopped chasing influencers and live day by day. I took on the name of my website and although it could be a shocking name, I was not into that. I am just unconventional. I begin to grow as an adult. I started to take responsibility for how I thought, and what I thought. I started to feel blessed. I was grateful for everything I had. I realized that everything was small in the scheme of things. And I was not going to sweat it. I started a path to love everyone regardless until they showed me a reason not to.

Trying to get on the radio full time as a firearms instructor failed but did get me on monthly as a topic for a well-known urban radio personality to talk gun rights. I learned that the Second Amendment was an evergreen topic in politics. I learned that gun rights advocacy is a cause and not a career. I learned that politics is a self-serving game not a government activity to help someone.
I learned that almost everything involving people can be boiled down to an algebraic formula. You can persuade and manipulate people to do almost anything you want to. And if you expose the lie to them, and tell them they are free, they will rebel and get mad at you for lifting the veil from their face. They don’t want the truth. It’s like that old cigarette commercial for Tareytown “Some would rather fight than switch.”

They cling to hate, socialism, racism, slave mentality, victimology, false prophets, and group think.

In 1992, I started a gun club named after the Tenth Cavalry Army unit aka the Buffalo Soldiers. It was a good premise. I learned a lot about people in the gun community. I learned about the power of numbers and marketing. When I had almost a hundred black people going to the range once a month, it gave me clout I wasn’t ready for. Ranges started to think every black person at the range was a member of our group. I became a local hit. Gun clubs nationally started asking me how to get more people of color into their groups, in order to save them from being ostracized by the community and extinction. I had the opportunity to exploit and I refused. The club was the first group to visit the new NRA building and range facility in Fairfax.

african american arms, Inc. kenn blanchard, Karlton hopkins, jeff cox
A3i took a bunch of photos but we didn’t last that long as a group. By the time, I got a business loan to open a training office near a local Maryland range I was on my own.

It lasted a year before going under. As it did, the NRA, the Law Enforcement Alliance of America, American Shooting Sports Foundation, CATO Institute and the Second Amendment Foundation found me. I traveled the country. I ate asparagus, sautéed spinach, and porterhouse steak for the first time in my life. I learned what lobbyist do. I saw what lobbyist see.

In 1999, a friend of mine, invested in me and help me build my first website to launch my book. AOL 1.0 was still working by baud modem attached to your phone line. Only big corporations had websites. When Y2K hit, my site was bigger than the NRA’s. I took the opportunity to hold prepping classes we would call today. I had several elder members of the Tenth Calvary that knew how to grow, can and prepare food for the apocalypse. Thank God it didn’t come but we had some good learning sessions.
I started writing my book, Black Man With A Gun  that is no longer in print when I was working as a sexton in a church where I later received the Call to ministry in. I thought that was going to be it for the Black Man With A Gun, but it is not. I even got in trouble there a few times.

I was close to the end of my career in the government and was failing to get promoted because (1) I was rebellious, (2) was told they had seen me on TV, print magazine and wouldn’t be here much longer (3) I don’t even know what the last one could be, accept I thought they we retrying to get rid of me permanently a few times, but I am protected by the Blood of Jesus.
When my cousin, got a signing bonus to go from the Buffalo Bills to Chicago Bears, he loaned me some money to publish my book, and relaunch my business. I was so much in debt at the time, it was a nightmare. Another fail for your friend and brother. I was now known around the country as “that black guy into guns.” But it didn’t move the needle for me.

African centric book stores refused to sell my book, saying they don’t want to promote violence. This is the same bookstore with books written by pimps, hitmen, and drug dealers. Oprahs’ people sent me an inquiry note, reviewed my book and then six months later said it was not something they wanted to promote.

The gun club started to grow and chapters grew in New Jersey, Baltimore and Chicago but I was not into the attention I was getting. I even got some correspondence from South Africa. They were looking for a leader to spark the cause. And that even happened here. I was still an employee of the US Government. I fully knew about organized domestic terrorism and the groups looked like. I also knew that I had a very high government clearance I didn’t want to lose.

I thought about and was approached to run for governor under the Libertarian ticket while I was still a government employee, so I declined. It was nice to be asked though.

Since then we have been just bee bopping around. I’ve started a few new podcast. Taking my ministry online with Speak Life.
You got to pay to play on several things.
• I tried buying a range once.
• I tried getting on a radio station.
• I ran for public office once.

Here’s some post I have written over the years.

Kenn Blanchard Is Officially the ‘Black Man With A Gun’

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/jun/25/book-review-how-the-cia-agent-became-a-pastor/#ixzz35gFx1EVE

Up Close and Personal with the Daniel Defense DDM4V9 5.56—New Gun Review

http://blog.beretta.com/author/kenn-blanch

If you like the podcast, download the free app for it on IOS at http://BlackManWithAGun.org also available in Google Play for Android. You can support this podcast at http://patreon.com/blackmanwithagun

All Politics Is Local – Gun Rights

The gun issue changed my life. It taught me the value of freedom. It showed me how my government works or doesn’t. It introduced me to politics.

As a gun owner you are responsible for the safety of yourself and everyone in your home. You enjoy the freedom of gun ownership. You enjoy the fun of owning, collecting, competing, hunting, and recreationally shooting. You may even own your firearm(s) for self-defense. Whatever your reason, sooner or later, you will be find out that part of that responsibility is to contribute to the national debate on gun rights. You are in the fight regardless of your political views, knowledge of the system, ability to articulate, education or financial, gender, ethnicity,  or marital status. You are a part of the political landscape because you believe in the right to keep and bear arms.

So what do you do? What organization do you join? Where should you send your money?

First of all, you know everyone is begging for your dollars. All organizations, clubs and committees are not equal. Beware of the ones with the best marketing, fancy logos, celeb endorsements.

Caveat Emptor.

Some groups do nothing. Some do a little. Some do as much as is they are able. Do your research.

Support the gun rights organizations that are working the local levels. I’m talking, your state organizations. They are underfunded, understaffed, under appreciated. I know there are the National blah, blah; and the blah, blah of America. You want to start being a soldier in the organization that is in your state. You know the one that has been begging you, annoying you to show up and be counted. Give them a second look.

The Tenth Amendment (Amendment X) to the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights. It expresses the principle of federalism and states’ rights, which supports the entire plan of the original Constitution for the United States of America, by stating that the federal government possesses only those powers delegated to it by the United States Constitution. All remaining powers are reserved for the states or the people.

Your local politics matter.

Every day, states take care of amenities and infrastructure, such as transportation and public schooling; the people who are elected in local elections have more impact and influence over citizens’ everyday lives than one may think. These people are accountable for almost everything the state is responsible for; the state controls taxes, welfare and the judiciary. Gun rights are a part of these. Once a state law does not contradict the federal constitution and is not an enumerated right of the federal government, the state can pass it. The state mandates most of the laws that people are afraid to break.

Locally elected officials are supposed to act on citizen’s behalf and convey their issues to the federal branch of the government. You know they don’t when it comes to guns. Therefore, participating in local elections is supposed to be the most democratic aspect of American politics; these elected officials are supposed to represent citizens.

If you’re tired of arguing with strangers on the internet, try talking with one of them in real life. If something needs fixing, then lace up your shoes and do some organizing. If you’re disappointed by your elected officials, grab a clipboard, get some signatures, and run for office yourself. Show up. Dive in. Stay at it. Step up and make a difference.

A political activist is someone who is involved in the political process for the sake of promoting, impeding or raising awareness of a certain issue or set of issues. It doesn’t pay but is needed now. Political activism typically involves engagement beyond just voting, whether it be through protest, demonstration or lecture.

I have to warn you, it is an investment of your time, and resources. You will often look around and wonder WTF am I doing here? These clowns don’t care. These clowns have their own agendas. You will see the professional organizations, lobbyist and lawyers in those halls, but they all started somewhere and you are in the fight now, not a spectator. You being there on the ground, is important. Look, learn, and connect with someone, in the State house because the assistant, the intern, the low level person they send out to talk to you, (because they are too busy), will be someone important in the future. Don’t belittle, push off, blow off anyone you meet.

Now is the time for you to give back to the land of the free and the home of the brave. Don’t let people you would not want to share a beverage with speak for you. Your silence gives them consent to do whatever. And they have been.

Our country tis of thee, baby…

If you like the podcast, download the free app for it on IOS at http://BlackManWithAGun.org also available in Google Play for Android. You can support this podcast at http://patreon.com/blackmanwithagun

Gun Control is Bearing False Witness Against Your Neighbor

Podcast 559

I shared the feelings of my ace writer on this blog Dave Cole and riffed on the article by J. Christian Adams, he linked to as well, in my thoughts about how folks think this gun control debacle is new. We must not let the socialist youth movement try to destroy our republic.

The 9th Commandment

You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor. Exodus 20:16

It is exactly what prohibitionist, and anti-rights do when they push for gun control. The people, you and I that are affected by the changes in laws not the criminals, the insane, the evil or the terrorist.

To be a false witness against our neighbor basically means to falsely accuse someone else of wrongdoing. In the Torah, false witnesses were dealt with very harshly. We see in the above verses that if a person was found to be bearing false witness against another person, they would be given the punishment that the other person would have received if the witness was true! With such a righteous law, we can understand why ‘by the mouth of two or three witnesses’ every matter truly was established. If anyone rose up as a false witness, they would be given the same punishment they thought to give to their neighbor…. risking their own life! With such a thing facing them, they would be very careful, yes?

If this righteous rule were established in today’s court systems, there wouldn’t be nearly the problems we see today.

We, the unwilling, led by the unknowing, are doing the impossible for the ungrateful. We have done so much, for so long, with so little, we are now qualified to do anything with nothing.

The idea that guns caused the carnage we have faced is so intellectually bankrupt that it is isn’t worth discussing. Remembering where we were as a nation just 30 years ago makes it even more so. It’s time to ask the real question. what changed?

Democracy?

The Pledge of Allegiance includes the phrase: “and to the republic for which it stands.”

Did you know that the United States is, indeed, a republic, not a democracy? Accurately defined, a democracy is a form of government in which the people decide policy matters directly–through town hall meetings or by voting on ballot initiatives and referendums.

Law of Self Defense with Andrew Branca

Shoot don’t shoot Scenario

Let us know what you think of the scenario on http://facebook.com/blackmanwithagun1 and this episode in general.

Talking with Michael video

Our corporate sponsors are Crossbreedholsters.com and USCCA

Thank you for supporting this podcast. http://patreon.com/blackmanwithagun

 

Thanks for listening, I am not the bombastic gun guy.  I might be a little too subdued for some.  But I’ve been around, since the fax machine and bulletin boards online.  I’ve been the leader of national black gun club called the tenth cavalry gun club that I founded in 1991.  I’ve testified for concealed carry reform in a few states.  I’ve been a part of the gun community since then.  I’ve lost jobs, bankrupted my family finances chasing after the dream of entrepreneurship in this space.  I have learned.  All my wisdom comes from the school of hard knocks.  I’ve seen smooth talkers, come and go.  I’ve seen the keypad contenders and the photograph pretenders.  I’m a life member of the NRA.  I helped edit the refuse to be a victim program. I’ve received commendations for the Eddie Eagle program and been awarded the Harlan Carter award for civil rights from the NRA.  I am currently on the training committee. Just FYI.

Did you know this podcast is over ten years old?  I’ve tried it all and I thank you for supporting me.  I hope you can tell I am trying to encourage our side.

We go through a lot staying free in America, in 2018.

 

If you like the podcast, download the free app for it on IOS at http://BlackManWithAGun.org also available in Google Play for Android. You can support this podcast at http://patreon.com/blackmanwithagun

What Should Happen When You Violate the Public Trust

It doesn’t always happen but this time it did.

Ex-state Sen. Leland Yee gets 5 years in prison in corruption case
Former California state Sen. Leland Yee has been sentenced to five years in prison after being slapped with a variety of shocking charges including gunrunning and money laundering. In the state legislature, Yee was a staunch gun-control advocate who actively campaigned against “assault weapons” before the FBI connected him to a massive arms trafficking operation.

Ginny Simone revisits his case and her original report that spotlighted the depth and brazenness of Yee’s hypocrisy.

Former state Sen. Leland Yee, who once aspired to statewide political office, will spend five years in federal prison for trading his political juice for money.
In a courtroom packed with family, observers and media, U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer on Wednesday imposed the sentence on the defrocked Bay Area politician, rejecting Yee’s bid for leniency and calling his sale of votes for money a “violation of the public trust.”