Tag: history

Shooting For Peace

Shooting For Peace

 

…..the ways of a man are before the Lord and He watches all his paths. – Proverbs 5:21

Thank you for listening, downloading and subscribing to this new chapter of my life.

Thank you for sharing, supporting, and staying a faithful friend. It’s good to be back. Thank you for asking me to come back. Thank you for the emails. Thank you for the recent well wishes on my Facebook debut and birthday celebration. I think I got more views on that one video than I did with my conversation with Colion Noir. I said that I came back because you asked me to; I came back because I have a few more things to say. I came back because I want you to help me do what I’ve been called to do, and I want to help you survive another week. I’ve had some time to appreciate you.

This week, I’m going to share with you my take on current events, and you don’t have to agree with me, but please hear me. Try to understand me. This is the start, the baseline, the ground-zero point. I’ll try to get more into guns, Second Amendment concealed carry as we go on. I thought I was done.

And then, 2020 happened.

Who would have known that it’s been a year of COVID-19, pandemic quarantines, the murder of George Floyd, the sparked protests across the United States and across the world, and that Australia burned? There was a toilet paper shortage for a hot minute. We were threatened with “murder hornets.” Everybody has to wear masks, and bars and churches closed. Black Lives Matter became a movement that was embraced around the world. And while we’re just sitting here and waiting, Swine Flu is threatening to join the mix. Who knew there would be a return of Marxism in America? Who planned for the destruction, looting, and the protest of police brutality? The latter is as old as our freedom. But wait, there’s more. They’ve got something called Antifa. We have the rejection of Confederate Anything, and the cancel culture.

The so-called minority gun owner that you’ve been trying to get to the range is finally here. They’re just not with you. They’re shooting on private lands at outdoor ranges and have created small groups to practice and train without you. And there’s even a national organization of African Americans that is celebrating explosive growth.

The infamous National Rifle Association has finally imploded after decades of poor decisions, secrets and mismanagement. It has exposed itself as a bloated, piss-poor representation of gun owners stuck in the ’80s. It has furloughed most of the staff. It has massive legal troubles, but, like our President, people still defend them with cult-like adoration. Meanwhile, highly paid lobbyists still run D.C. All are taking advantage of the loyalty of its members who don’t live in this city. Ninety-eight percent of the politicians around here are not cool. This is a personal observation and opinion. Anyone who’s been in office longer than two terms is no longer serving the people.

I believe that foreign influencers are using social media to pit us against each other. People want to defund the police — which is right out of the textbook of toppling a government by foreign governments. I know a little something about that. I believe our Executive branch has been compromised by foreign interest, but you’re not ready for that truth yet.

You want to talk about guns and American history, mostly, right? You want me to give you some product reviews and interview some interesting people? I’m going to do that. And along the way, I’m going to make you think a little, and hopefully help you understand why we are here and where we might be going.

In all truth, I don’t have all the answers. I don’t have to be right. And I don’t have to come back, but I want to now. I want to meet you in the middle so we can walk together, talk together, and fight together.

Now, you know that in the twelve years that the Urban Shooter / Black Man With A Gun Show Podcast has been on, I have always strived to be family-friendly and office-safe. I may have to deviate from that in the future – not from my language, but from the sources that I’m going to use.

I’m going to be giving you history. I’m going to be giving you some educational stuff, some entertainment, things that are not pretty, but they’re ours. If you’re brave enough to stay with me, if you trust me, I promise we’re going somewhere with this. My disclaimer is that I’m not trying to prove that I’m right. What I’m going to try to do, and only you will know if I’m successful, is to speak to what is up. Did you realize that we are right in the middle of a revolution? This isn’t the Civil Rights Era, or is it? There’s gotta be a new name for it, but I don’t have it yet. Have you heard of one? Whatever it is, I’m right here with you. If you were my friend before 2020, you are probably still my friend.

Epictetus says that it’s not what happens to you, but how you react to it, that matters.

Since 2014, I’ve been a member of the Crossbreedholsters.com family. If you carry concealed, get a holster that comes with a try-it-free lifetime guarantee. 

If you have been a long-time listener of this podcast, you know, for many years, I would open up with John Wayne leading us in the Pledge of Allegiance. Somewhere, around my tenth year on the air, I had somebody tell me that John Wayne was a racist. It hurt me that I didn’t know, but I wasn’t surprised. And because I enjoyed all the Wild West movies that John Wayne had been in, it took me awhile to replace it. I had to think about it, ruminate on it and marinate on that thing. But as I started to do that and peel back the curtain on so many things of our country and our history, it got uglier and uglier. For the record, I still believe to my very soul that this is the very best country in all of the fifteen that I have visited in my lifetime. I would rather be nowhere else.

Them Damn Millennials.

We used to make fun of the younger folks, but guess what? They are changing the world. I know you don’t agree with the burning, looting, the defund-the-police, and all that. It is all stupid stuff, including the tearing down of monuments, but let’s look at it from a view of 60,000 feet above the Earth. Let’s rise above our own issues and thoughts, and look at it differently for a minute. At the speed of social media, these sapsuckers have done what folks have been trying to do since the Civil Rights Era. They’ve embarrassed us and reminded us that we have just accepted some stuff that we should not have. Not everyone will agree, but time will tell. The time had come for us to stop revering and instead reconciling the complexity of heroism and evil in America. That reckoning should have begun in the public school, but it didn’t. They’re doing it now. And how the sausage is made is never pretty.

The Sausage of Freedom.

Making freedom. It isn’t pretty. It’s kind of close to being like sausage. To make a pork sausage, you gotta kill a pig. You gotta clean the thing. You must cut the meat. You must grind it up. You must mix it and season it and put it in a cellulose sleeve. It is horrible to look at, but when you seal it, cook it, or grill it, that’s some good-tasting stuff – if you like pork. How we got to this point; how we think we discovered this world, the colonization of North America, the murder of indigenous people to the bringing of different nationalities here….Those who escaped other places to come here to form this nation…..The rise of slavery, the wars, Civil War reconstruction, the progressive era…..The so-called World Wars, the mid-century and the Cold War, and mixed in there were lynchings and the civil rights era and atrocities to humanity. How the sausage of freedom was made. Not a pretty picture. You can’t just glaze it over. You can’t pick one thing and can’t choose it.

But this land is your land. And this land is my land – from California to the New York Island, from the Redwood Forest to the gulf stream waters….This land was made for you and for me.

If you will look at the 60,000 foot view, it has taken us a long time to make change happen. I have gotten used to it. There are statues, flags and things that I, as a free, law-abiding American citizen would never stand near, take a photo with, or acknowledge, because it doesn’t represent ALL of us. After I learned the history of President Woodrow Wilson, for example, I have no problem with removing his name from anywhere. And then the list just keeps going on, but don’t let me stop there. Don’t leave me yet. Listen, we recognize that our nation’s founding was far from perfect. Don’t look at the destruction as all negative though. Let’s go back in history. Let’s do that, and let’s go back to Greek/Roman history.

There was a guy by the name of Lois Malraux, who says that we judge a society by the monuments it puts up. So, imagine the society, a Roman society, that puts up statues of tyrants, people who nearly succeeded in tearing the country apart, who did horrible, inexplicably, cruel things, even by standards of their own time. Why leave a statue of that person up?

Is tearing down statues destroying history, or is it simply the obvious response of a freed people with a conscience? Of course, the past is complicated. But the fact that something is hard and complicated does not absolve us from the responsibility of resolving it. Rome was able to tear down the monuments of its worst villains, but here, in America, and in the rest of the world, we have more tools at our disposal besides angry Millennials. We can still study and learn about these people in our history books and our schools, but we can take them off of public property, removing them from their prominent places in front of courthouses and capitals, which are supposed to be the houses of ALL the people. All people. If Marcus Aurelius had caused the death of a million Romans and torn the empire in half for the sole purpose of protecting slavery, would he be our hero? No. If he had done it as recently as some people’s great-grandparents, definitely not. If his likeness had been appropriated by vicious tyrants who subverted the rule of law to intimidate fellow citizens, and if his likeness was put up in statutes paid for still by tax dollars, would it be worth protecting? Now, we can make good arguments about Marcus Aurelius. There are good arguments about the good that Churchill did. There are good arguments in favor of Jefferson and Washington and others, but only a coward is afraid of having a conversation.

What about Nathan Bedford Forrest? Jefferson Davis was a fool. Robert E. Lee betrayed his prior service to his country when he raised arms against it and sent a generation of men to their deaths in a rebellion to protect a way of life that enslaved humans. At first I was like you: What the Hell? What is a statue going to do to you today?

Let’s jump on that Black Lives Matter thing for a minute.

One of the obstacles to having an open conversation about race is the tendency to downplay things that are not truly or really racist. And this can actually emboldened or encourage prejudice. The Black Lives Matter movement is real. It is legit. The Black Lives Matter organization to me is another animal all to itself. In 2013, after the acquittal of George Zimmerman killing of Trayvon Martin, Black Lives Matter was born. It was a protest group. Since then it is a group that has been infiltrated by other agendas. The movement itself is not new. It is exactly the same movement with a different name that came about in the ’60s. If you go back and look at your text, you will find pictures of men and women with signs saying, “Am I not a man?” that is an updated version from the past. It stems from the Dred Scott decision that wanted to say that people of African descent were not fully human, thereby they were not citizens of this country or entitled to any of its rights.

 

When you see a sign that says Black Lives Matter it is not denouncing that all life matters. It is saying that we value the life of a person that because of the color of his or her skin was thought of as not being fully human, had no rights to vote, and could not own a firearm. When you try to say All Life Matters, it detracts from that message. You are negating that there was a struggle. You are saying that we should forget that hurt, and that that pain is not important. We have an unreconciled past. So, when you say anything, you diminish others. Oh, you’re saying a lot.

That’s why I advise many of my friends to shut up. Don’t wait to be heard. Listen, there’s some things happening right here in your space, in this time period that you’re missing by trying to be right, trying to get your points made, trying to make your memes pop or even creating groups on the side. You’re not helping at all. The Black Lives Matter movement has given us a moment to reflect on a very important matter: our history of racism. When I was becoming a podcaster, when I was tackling things like the Second Amendment and the right to keep and bear arms for all people, I was advised to stay away from the race word truth. As soon as you talk about race, it gets quiet because everybody involved is uncomfortable. But guess what? The millennials don’t care – They’re going for it. They are putting it in our faces. And because of all the craziness they have done, change is happening again from the 60,000 foot view. This is a good thing, because in the end we have to reckon with ourselves; We have to reconcile. We have to fix what’s not right. It’s about time. We’ve been rolling wrong for a long time, and just accepting it, believing the lie because it’s been told so many times. Now, you don’t have to subscribe to doctrines of racial superiority or incite racial violence to say or do something that has racist implications. It’s in our speech. It’s in our culture. Racism is as much about impact as it is about intention. We shouldn’t forget about those who are on the receiving end of that discrimination.

 

–All right, Kenn, I’m hearing you, but um, what am I supposed to be doing now? — Well, here’s the problem that folks don’t realize: Millennials know how to start some mess, but they can’t fix it all. We still need to be involved. They still need our guidance. The end. It might be a 40-year-old or 30-year-old. Now, they’re as smart as I don’t know what, but they don’t have any life experience. They’ll know how to talk to anybody, but they don’t know politics. It’s time for us to step up now and instruct them, show them, now that they got a firearm, how to use it.

Because even though politics is jacked up right now, they need to be involved in that too, to change things. Don’t let one side be the answer for everything. Now, it’s time for you to get your butt in gear and assist and help and give consultation to these folks who are on fire to change the world without guidance. It’s the Lord of the Flies. I need the adults who are strong among us to work with these people. They’re not all bad. They just don’t have all the answers. They don’t have all the, you know, the inside stuff – the stuff we take for granted. And if we let them, they’ll burn the crap to the ground and not realize that you also have to rebuild. Don’t give up on them. Don’t leave them to their own devices. Don’t let some other interests take them away from us. We still have a chance to fix this country, but we must be involved, and you can only be involved if you’re talking to them. Communication is more important now than ever.

The Rise of the Black Gun Owner

Collectively, we still are little kids on the playground picking sides by gender, color, size and familiarity. Look back at kindergarten, remember when we used to segregate ourselves? All the kindergarten kids, the first-grade kids, the big kids from the little kids. There was the all-girl groups and over there, all the boys. And then, as we grew and social constructs began, we segregated ourselves by race. In nature, we separate ourselves for safety. Anything you think is strange is a threat. Well, right now, in an elementary sense of the word, we are grouping ourselves for safety. There is a fear that’s promoted and pushed pretty well by foreign governments on social media. The Race War. People fall for it. It sells black fatigues pretty well.

I have found that over time, as the group grows, it learns that it can’t be monolithic. You can’t be all “one people.” You must be diverse if you want to grow outside of your niche. If you want to grow outside of your field, you must embrace other people. That’s why there’s power in diversity. It’s a growth thing. Once you leave kindergarten and go to college, you mix and learn about other languages, other people, other cultures, and you get stronger because you grow in knowledge. In the beginning, it’s safer to be exclusive. There are some positives for being racist and segregationist. As a group, you can grow really fast. You can grow really strong. You can garner a lot of power using fear in small groups. But when you are ready to train outside of your group or shoot different firearms and travel to other ranges, you have to change.

It’s a growth thing. It’s a maturity thing.

I hope that one day we get to see that Americans realize that we are all the same with this faith. We will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day. This will be the day when all of God’s children will be able to sing with new meaning, “my country ’tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died. Land of the Pilgrim’s pride. From every mountainside, let freedom ring.”!! And if America is to become a great nation, then this must be true. – Dr. MLK

Another thing that makes us different is not only our age and core values, but many of us served in uniform and took an oath to defend the constitution of the United States and to serve as an example to an America that doesn’t transfer or translate to the folks you see on “rage TV.”

Hang on, brother.

Yes, the media is doing what it does. It is showing you what you want to see to scare you. You know, we like to be scared. Some of us are writing articles about a race war and how we won’t kneel – none of which is helping anybody. The best advice I can give to friends who are listening is to not respond, not knee-jerk reaction, not come off-the-cuff, not try to be cute, to just shut up right now, but I’ll get back to that. I know that’s tough to hear from your friend. I know you know this, I’m just here to remind you. We have been here before. I didn’t think we would return, but humanity is not as cogent progressive or intelligent as it claims to be.

I’m still gonna need some financial help to get this puppy moving. If you can, please contribute to the https://patreon.com/blackmanwithagun , or to buy-me-a-coffee links. I still believe that

none of us is as strong as all of us.

I know, it’s been rough. It’s been tough. It’s been hard, but don’t let the media get ya. You’ve been right on so many things. Let’s continue to walk this thing together. Amen? And just in case, nobody has told you this today – I’m sure they haven’t, so I’m going to tell you – I love you. And there’s not a damn thing you can do about it.

Until next week. Shalom, baby.

Reverend Kenn Blanchard

Check out these podcast:  Black Man With A Gun Show ,  Speak Life church , and  Indian Motorcycle radio  The Books, Kenn has written.
Grandmas Gun

Grandmas Gun

My maternal grandmother introduced me to the history of the Second Amendment and busted the myth of gun control. Her annual ritual of celebratory gun fire gave me the true origin of Watch Night.

Grandma was not a gun rights advocate, or a politician. She and my ailing grandfather lived in poverty about 500 yards from the Virginia border of North Carolina on a small farm. Historically it was the same location that Nat Turner ran through and hid after becoming a fugitive for fighting slavery and leading a four-day rebellion of both enslaved and free black people in Southampton County, Virginia, in 1831. It was remote, rural and poor.

Grandmas was the orphanage for our family. Her barn was the storehouse for baby items, and furniture. Instead of selling stuff, our families brought it here if it could be reused by a new parent, newlywed or member of the family needing to start out. Except for the baby cribs, most of it was never reused. It was just junk.

My grandparents raised hogs, chickens, ducks, and rabbits and had a garden. Only two neighbors. The closest was 500 yards down the road on one side. The other was the hunting lodge a mile in the other direction.

No indoor toilets, (we had an outhouse and chamber pots) no showers, drafty in the winter, blazing hot in the summers, it was going back in time.

My grandfather suffered a stroke early in my life and walked with a cane. He was slightly disabled, but still worked the farm when able, and then there was grandma who took care of us all.

It was the best time of my life.

A small pond / swamp also was connected to the property which was my playground growing up. Dish and bathwater were dumped into this place. There was a grapevine at the end of the property that was the home of bees, and all manner of creeping things.

It was in this home that I first saw my grandmother use the shotgun that sat behind the wood burning stove in the kitchen all my life.

My understanding of the Second Amendment, and gun ownership began with that shotgun. It was naturally camouflaged by rust, age and dirt. It was probably a Sears Roebuck 12-gauge 101 shotgun for the collectors.

It was that shotgun that became the base of my pro-gun stance. For people that are ignorant about guns that was what I was exposed to because of my grandmother. It was unlocked, loaded and accessible gun in a kitchen, with 3-10 grandchildren in the house at any time. No accidents, no fear of it. We respected our grandparents. We respected their home, rules and gun.

One summer that I spent there as a child amped up my appreciation of arms and my grandmother. While playing near the swamp, a four foot water moccasin came out of the water to dry itself and warm up. I was just standing there when it came out of the water. Water moccasins are an aggressive species of poisonous snake also known as the Cottonmouth. When it found its spot on the bank, it didn’t want any crap from a young kid like me. It hissed, bared its fangs and stood up to make itself look bigger.

It worked because it scared the crap out of me. I screamed. SNAKE! Grandma- Snake! It was then that I saw the marksmanship of my grandmother.

Except for New Year’s, which I will share with you next, I didn’t know if my grandmother could use the gun. I don’t remember my age but I know when she came to the screen door and saw the snake about six feet away from me, she went into mama bear mode.

“What do you want boy” she said looking through the screen door on the back porch. She saw me, she saw the snake and went back in the house.

Grandma I yelled again, not wanting to be left alone. I didn’t know she saw my predicament.

She came back in seconds. I was a first relieved and then I got worried. She had that old shotgun and started walking toward me.

The first thing I thought of was, she is old. What if she can’t shoot? She ain’t the Rifleman. She might shoot me. But that is how she walked. Like the rifleman straight at me.

No grandma no I said quietly,

Steadily walking toward me…

She mounted the shotgun into her shoulder like a soldier, looking down the barrel and without warning fired a shot which expertly disintegrated the black snake. Parts of which went back into the swamp.

The noise of the shotgun made me jump. After I looked at where the snake should have been all I saw was the back of grandma going back into the house, going back to whatever grandmas do, not even phased or concerned.

I just stood there, mouth opened, still in shock from the whole event. I wasn’t shot, she kept me from being bit, she had fired an old shotgun from what I realized today was a good distance on the move.

YAY Grandma!

The second time I saw the shotgun move from behind the stove was during hunting season. It was a cold morning, during my Christmas break and a truck load of white men drove onto the farm unannounced. By the time a couple of them approached the outer door, Grandma had the shotgun in hand as she opened the door to greet them. They never knew it but she was armed.

With practiced “sweetness” she answered the door, ready to defend us if necessary. The white men were just as polite and apologized for the interruption and offered “Ms Mary” some venison should they be lucky today. It was in exchanges like that I saw examples of how an armed society was a polite society. I think that is a podcast somewhere.

And then finally the annual event that reminds me of my grandma’s shotgun was watch night otherwise known as New Year’s Eve.

For some people making noise, and popping corks is the extent of celebrating the New Years’ revelry but I want to share with you what it meant to an African American woman born before women were allowed to vote, the Titanic sank, and during the time when people of color were discouraged from voting. Someone who was a child during the conflict of WWI, and Virginia’s alcohol prohibition.

My great grandparents where the first generation to celebrate the experience what was first called Freedoms Eve.

You see, New Year’s Eve used to be a special occasion in African American culture. Celebratory gunfire meant more than noise making. Freed men owned guns, slaves did not.

Let’s go back to December 31, 1862. After the Union Army was victorious at the Battle of Antietam on September 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued a preliminary proclamation that declared that all slaves in “any state or designated part of a state . . . In rebellion against the United States shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free.” Many blacks in the North and South as well as both free and enslaved blacks anxiously waited for Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation to become effective on January 1, 1863.

Wide eyed with anticipation, many African Americans dared not sleep throughout the late night hours because they wanted to watch “the night turn into a new dawn.” As they watched, many slaves reflected on their hardships and toils, mourned the memory of their ancestors and loved ones who died in slavery, and spent time thanking and praised God for allowing them and their descendants to watch the night of captivity pass.

The chains of poverty, racism, and discrimination have acted as constricting shackles for many African Americans throughout the course of the century following emancipation. Being only quasi-free and given the illusion of equality, many African Americans derived hope from the well spring of their faith as they struggled for the realization of God’s perfect will for true liberation and justice

But this wasn’t universal. Many African Americans want “to distance themselves from the more painful and degrading aspect of the race’s collective past,” as they feel that celebrating emancipation kept the memory of slavery alive. After 1870, and even continuing into the twentieth century, many African Americans advocated halting Freedom Day commemorations. It is rarely even mentioned in church services.

Shooting a gun wasn’t allowed for many of us. We have culturally added prohibitions on ourselves to prevent our children from being lynched, or jailed. This self-inflicted behavior is from the Black Codes. The first gun control law in Virginia was circa 1639 where the General Assembly of Virginia specifically excludes blacks from the requirement of possessing arms.

Black codes were restrictive laws designed to limit the freedom of African Americans and ensure their availability as a cheap labor force after slavery was abolished during the Civil War. Though the Union victory had given some 4 million slaves their freedom, the question of freed blacks’ status in the postwar South was still very much unresolved. Under black codes, many states required blacks to sign yearly labor contracts; if they refused, they risked being arrested, fined and forced into unpaid labor. Outrage over black codes helped undermine support for President Andrew Johnson and the Republican Party.

The end of slavery in 1865 did not eliminate the problems of racist gun control laws; the various Black Codes adopted after the Civil War required blacks to obtain a license before carrying or possessing firearms or Bowie knives; these are sufficiently well-known that any reasonably complete history of the Reconstruction period mentions them. These restrictive gun laws played a part in the efforts of the Republicans to get the Fourteenth Amendment ratified, because it was difficult for domestic terrorist aka night riders (KKK) to generate the correct level of terror in a victim who was returning fire. It does appear, however, that the requirement to treat blacks and whites equally before the law led to the adoption of restrictive firearms laws in the South that were equal in the letter of the law, but unequally enforced.

High Court rules has no power to stop KKK members from disarming blacks. In United States v. Cruikshank, 92 U.S. at 548-59 (1875) A member of the KKK, Cruikshank had been charged with violating the rights of two black men to peaceably assemble and to bear arms. The U.S. Supreme Court held that the federal government had no power to protect citizens against private action (not committed by federal or state government authorities) that deprived them of their constitutional rights under the 14th Amendment. The Court held that for protection against private criminal action, individuals are required to look to state governments. “The doctrine in Cruikshank, that blacks would have to look to state government for protection against criminal conspiracies gave the green light to private forces, often with the assistance of state and local governments, that sought to subjugate the former slaves and their descendants… With the protective arm of the federal government withdrawn, protection of black lives and property was left to largely hostile state governments.” (GLJ, p. 348.)

When I was a kid, all my heroes had guns. Around Christmas time that was all I wanted. All the popular TV shows had guys with trademarked guns. Cowboys, spies, cops, cartoons, and soldiers all had cool guns.

Oh yeah and my grandma.

Check out these podcast:  Black Man With A Gun Show ,  Speak Life church , and  Indian Motorcycle radio  The Books, Kenn has written.
Five Things You Need To Know About EDC

Five Things You Need To Know About EDC

Thank you for listening, downloading and supporting the Black Man With A Gun Show Podcast.

This is episode 579.

This week Michael and I talk about concealed carrying your firearm every day.  When and where to carry is a little like walking around naked.  Some places its comfortable, and other times its inappropriate, offense and even illegal.  Mike says you need:

  1. Mindset
  2. Skills
  3. Tactics
  4. Gear 
  5. Insurance (we suggest the United States Concealed Carry Association https://uscca.blackmanwithagun.com )

    Movie Reference

assault of Precinct 13

If you want to see a movie that does everything wrong, check out this 1976 classic film.  Silencers on revolvers, pump shotguns that shoot 3x before reloading and more.  All the things that feed the ignorance and fear of anti-rights folks and those that fear guns.

Welcome to all new listeners. thanks for being a part of my family.  I look forward to talking with you in the future.  Join us online on our Facebook page @facebook.com/blackmanwithagun1

And for some reason I had a little Georgia on my Mind.  I share a little history of gun laws in Georgia.  The past wasn’t pretty and usually isn’t but we have two great groups now in the Peach State.  Check out NAAGA.co aka the National African American Gun Association and GeorgiaCarry.org that is doing great things.  I had a chance to present there and it was phenomenal.

I am a fan of https://Crossbreedholsters.com and they support this podcast.  Please reciprocate if you are  looking for leather belts, holsters and magazine wear.

Mike mentioned three holster companies he likes – one of which was JM4 Tactical.

Tips Feature:  Effective ways to train on a budget

 

 

Maryland Gun Owners please join and support:  https://www.marylandshallissue.org

 

PS

I realized this week that having a co-host can be a benefit. Michael has helped me in times when I was frustrated with politics of gun rights. His being new and still excited to the movement is sometimes contagious.

I have started a fiction series about a blues playing werewolf named Solomon Love.  It’s different than my pro-gun, 2A stuff you know about.  I am hoping you will check out my books.  I am working on the third now, the first two are available on Amazon and Kindle.  Do me a favor and buy them, review them and support this facet of my life. 

http://www.kennblanchard.com

Speaking of facets.

If you need a pastor, a Christian brother, for any reason, join us at http://speaklifechurch.net

You can listen to this weeks podcast here on the player below.

Check out these podcast:  Black Man With A Gun Show ,  Speak Life church , and  Indian Motorcycle radio  The Books, Kenn has written.

Thanks For Visiting