Tag: black man with a gun

Black Man With a Gun for Silencerco

Black Man With a Gun for Silencerco

The  year 2020 has been difficult for many of us.  I am glad to get some good news and share with you.  The ranges have been packed with new gun owners.  Most look like me.  It is unbelievable. 

Fear is still behind the sales but it aint the first time.  

What is the good news?

I am happy to announce that I will be a brand ambassador for the world’s largest firearm silencer manufacturer, SilencerCo. The company based in West Valley, UT is the nation’s leading designer and manufacturer of suppressors. SilencerCo is dedicated to creating products that will improve sound reduction levels, durability and longevity, form and function, ease of use and maintenance in ways never thought of or achieved.

I’m excited because I get to share my journey with you through social media.

Brand Ambassador

I used to think that silencers were only for the rich.  Some people think silencers are only for bad guys in the movies. And although the government has made it tough to get a suppressor you can own one legally.  In the upcoming videos and blog post,  I am going to be sharing the 5W’s  (Why, who, where, when, and What) of suppressors from my friends at SilencerCo.  The one in the video is an Osprey model that is on my Gen 3 Glock 17.  My review and demos are not going to be from a tech guy perspective.  We will talk tech but I am not geeking out on it and pretending to be an engineer or tinkerer.  This will be from a regular guy, gun enthusiast, law abiding suburban gun owner like you.  

There are some cool things about its design.  I hope to share who made the thing.  Why you should get one or two.  How it can help you.  How to get one.  When they were created.  And stuff that you won’t hear anywhere else.  You’ll see my flubs and mistakes.  I plan to share the journey with you so you can start off smarter.   

Unfortunately, if you live in the District of Columbia, California, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, and the Rhode Island you can’t own one.  You can get one is you are a legally eligible to purchase a firearm in your state of residence, able to pass a BATFE background check and are at least 21 years of age you can  purchase from a dealer. 

They are called cans, mufflers, silencers and suppressors. 

How they work is simple. 

  1. Instead of exiting directly from the muzzle, propellant gases first enter the silencer’s expansion chamber, losing some of their energy.
  2. Pressure continues to divert and slow within the baffles while heat dissipates, allowing the projectile to exit before the majority of the gas.
  3. As a result, the report of the shot is suppressed to a hearing-safe level and the de-corking effect, or BANG!, is mitigated.

 

As I learn, I’ll share the details with you here or on Silencerco.com so you can get the truth about silencers.  

Subscribe to the podcast, blackmanwithagun.com  and the YouTube channel.  

 

Kenn

 

Check out these podcast:  Black Man With A Gun Show ,  Speak Life church , and  Indian Motorcycle radio  The Books, Kenn has written.
Top 12 Episodes of this Podcast

Top 12 Episodes of this Podcast

Top 12 

How Does It Feel To Be Right?

 

Lessons For Colion Noir

 

John Wick on Gun Rights

 

Armed Christian Perspectives

5 Things You Need to Know Before Shooting Naked

 

Why We Love History (and you should too!)

3D Gun Printing is BS

 

Hurricane Florence

 

 

Five Things You Need To Know About EDC

 

5 Things you should know about shotguns

 

5 Mistakes In Gun Rights That Make You Look Dumb

 

Keeping your Back Hole Out of Jail

 

Mind Blown

Mind Blown

Had a good friend call me last night excited with a new idea he just had. He suggested I write a childrens book about guns. He said he was tired of all the gun violence. He said that I had credibility and knowledge that would make people listen. My head exploded.

Mind Blown GIF by SYFY - Find & Share on GIPHY

I grew up in an athletic family.  I have two cousins that made it to the professional sports level.  My father was trying to play professional baseball in New York before he “remembered” he had enlisted.  My mother was a star basketball player in high school.  Somehow those genes missed me.  I however was a marksman.  I didn’t know it was important or esteemed until the State Department placed a bunch of different firearms in front of me preparing to serve as an Embassy Guard overseas as a US Marine.  After enlistment, I got a good government job with the Central Intelligence Agency.  They nurtured my curiosity and gift which led me to shoot firearms from all over the world.  I became a trainer for our security teams and agents.  I have been trained by some of the best in the world to teach.  By the time I got to the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Glynco, Georgia; I was a distinguished expert.  And when we didn’t have time to train folks, they sent me to protect VIPs in 13 hostile places.

I became internationally known and trademarked the name Black Man with A Gun™. I was ordained in the Baptist church and became a pastor which being pro-gun was a challenge. I have testified in the state legislatures of Virginia, Texas, South Carolina, Michigan, Maryland, and Wisconsin. I have been podcasting since 2007. I have voiced commercials for TV and radio against racist gun laws. I have been featured in four documentaries. I have authored several books.
 
It was then that I noticed for the first time, the disparagingly low numbers of African Americans in the gun magazines, books and competitions.  I created African American Arms & Instruction, (A3i) in 1991.  Forbidden by “the government” from using my bona fides for marketing, I got used to not promoting myself to my own detriment.  I did connect with like minds as a gun advocate and began my crusade to change the hearts and minds of people I thought would eventually see the light.  As an advocate before the age of social media, I got beat up by all the usual suspects often not on camera but in churches, town halls and state houses. I wrote the first edition of Black Man With A Gun in 2000 to help me get the word out.  I created a national African American gun club in 1992.  I met the founder of USCCA then and forged a friendship as he was building his magazine and ultimately USCCA as it is today. Rewrote the book in 2014.  I retired from the Second Amendment struggle in 2019.  Letting the younger lions take it on.  I’m a little more coordinated now than I was as a kid.  I can run and shoot accurately now, just not that fast.

Since he obviously forgot all that, I suggested I should probably then try to influence state laws, lobby, get on TV, radio, create a podcast, a website, a facebook group, and travel to places of worship to speak too. I gently reminded him that “gun violence” is a misnomer. That all he has just mentioned I have done for thirty years. I shared with him that the gun advocacy ranks have risen and that I knew of at least ten new “soldiers.” (I wondered how he had missed it)

Stick a fork in me mama, I’m done.

Check out these podcast:  Black Man With A Gun Show ,  Speak Life church , and  Indian Motorcycle radio  The Books, Kenn has written.
Who Is Kenn Blanchard?

Who Is Kenn Blanchard?

I think if you stay around long enough folks will find you.  I got a chance to be a guest on the GunWebsites channel.  Looking forward to sharing wisdom, trading information and helping new warriors not make the same mistakes I have in twenty years of gun rights advocacy and training the public.

@IG kennblanchard

blackmanwithagun.tv 

Check out these podcast:  Black Man With A Gun Show ,  Speak Life church , and  Indian Motorcycle radio  The Books, Kenn has written.
The Business of Gun Rights Podcasting

The Business of Gun Rights Podcasting

Today many are trying to find as I did how to monetize a brand new medium.  How do you make your hobby a sustainable income stream?  How do you justify the hours spent creating content for the bean counters in your life?

First a disclaimer; if you are doing this as a hobby or altruistic goals to spread the truth about the US Constitution and gun rights then you don’t have to monetize.  There is nothing wrong with that.  I started off that way.  I found out that I needed to monetize to operate.

Before you seek to make money you need to provide good content for a while.

 

Social Media as you see it today came after the Black Man with A Gun Show Podcast formerly known as the Urban Shooter Podcast.  It is hard to imagine promoting your blog or podcast today without Instagram, Facebook, or YouTube but I did.

Like the pro athletes of yesterday that ran miles, suffered concussions, broken bones and made millions less than the stars of today;  I am in that group.

Over the past twelve years I have tried and did a number of things to pay for the bandwidth, hosting, hardware and software use to podcast.

One of the things I have to do better is to promote the people that have supported  me.  I plan to do that better in 2019.

There is an art to promotion, marketing and selling that is not offensive to your audience.  Nobody likes being sold to nonstop.  We are almost used to it but we don’t like it.

For the business owners that may be interested in sponsoring my work in the future here is a snapshot of my statistics for my podcast.

 

 

I also have an customized app that could be co-branded.  It has had over 8K downloads.

 

For my fellow content creators here are a few tips.

As an entrepreneur in the 2A community that has tried a little of everything to be successful I want to share what I found what works in almost every business.

Here are five ways I know a content creator can make money.  It is easier to write than to achieve.

  1. Crowdfunding
  2. Sponsors
  3. Selling products
  4. Affiliates
  5. Services

 

The gun world is pretty cool. The people are interesting. I’ve been a part of it since 1986.

The subject of gun control is evergreen. The topic is political. There is money to be made and unfortunately wasted. Organizations exploit the hell out of it.  We fall for the shenanigans like clockwork.

My first advice to the new business owner  is to find a niche. The riches are in the niches.

Firearms instruction

Know that there are hundreds of instructors coming up and going out. The ones that stick around, have identified their target audience,  and with rifle precision have gone after them. The shotgun approach or just hanging out your “shingle” and waiting for customers doesn’t work well.

Like my grandma used to say, “if you chase two rabbits, you’ll get none.”

To fill a scheduled class for example, all of your clients should be the same. This is not in looks but in what they want from the course. Some can’t be there for one thing and the other for something else. You have to know what they want and give it to them.

One of your challenges  is going to be that your perspective clients don’t know actually what they want. Part of your process has to be to change that. You have to prequalify them.

That way you ain’t wasting your time.

As an instructor you have to keep learning yourself. Don’t be satisfied with just the NRA instructor certification. The NRA did an amazing job marketing their standard but it isn’t the end all.

You will also need to know marketing, basic business, adult learning techniques, and some crisis management. After every shooting, you have the opportunity for a televised or radio interview. You have to learn how to present yourself in a way that you want and not what the media wants. It’s a skill.

You have to be able to critical of yourself and teaching style so you can determine what market is best for you. Believe it or not, everyone is not going to like you. (I know hard to believe isn’t it?) You might be a great fit though for an all-female class, or not. You might work better with law enforcement, or not.

There’s a lot more but I’ll share the rest later.

 

 

Rev. Kenn Blanchard has been a firearms instructor since 1986. He has traveled abroad armed in over thirteen countries protecting diplomats and VIPs. He has trained with the USMC, Navy, US Army, IDF, US State Dept., FLETC and others. He created African American Arms & Instruction, Inc. training security guards, police officers and civilians in first aid, CPR and firearms use. He became a gun rights activist in 1991 and helped five states get concealed carry reform. He is respected in the firearms industry. He created blackmanwithagun.com in 1999. He is the author of Black Man With A Gun: Reloaded and created the podcast in 2007 that now has reached over 2.1 million downloads.

Check out these podcast:  Black Man With A Gun Show ,  Speak Life church , and  Indian Motorcycle radio  The Books, Kenn has written.
Celebrating the Tie that Binds

Celebrating the Tie that Binds

Last week we hit the 600 mark on podcast.  I started in the winter of 2006 and have learned a lot about myself, the world and the gun community as a result.

The podcast ties together the friends, instructors, activist, and gun owners I have met since 1991.

I use the show to not only talk about guns, products and politics but to encourage, inspire and entertain this group of patriots, great citizens, and family members using the power of podcasting.

Gun rights activist, firearms instructor, humanitarian and patriot, Rev. Kenn Blanchard is raising money to travel this Spring to meet you, his friends.

 

 

 

This design will be made into a high quality, PVC key chains to sell as mementos to reaching 600 episodes on the Black Man with A Gun Show podcast and being a leader in the grassroots gun community since 1991.

Click here to order yours.  Only $5.50 plus .50 shipping


You can get a tee shirt and other cool stuff at Kenn’s store which also supports his work, and encourages him to fight on without relying on begging corporate sponsors.Power to the People! 
Check out these podcast:  Black Man With A Gun Show ,  Speak Life church , and  Indian Motorcycle radio  The Books, Kenn has written.
3 Reasons to Start Using a Podcast For Your Political Campaign

3 Reasons to Start Using a Podcast For Your Political Campaign

I had an unsuccessful run in 2014 for the county council person seat now held by Derrick Davis. One of my shortcomings aside from being a Republican in Prince Georges County was that I was an unknown entity to both my party and the county I sought to serve. The one thing I do know really well is podcasting. I’ve been podcasting and in this space since 2007. There are three strong reasons why you and the party need to start a podcast. There are more reasons but let me share just a few.

1. Podcasting can build stronger relationships
2. Podcasting can connect with local influencers and donors.
3. Podcasting gives you, your own private stage.

 

I should have used the power of podcasting earlier in my campaign to grow my base. I should have used my podcast to answer the frequently asked questions of my position. I could have used podcasting to interview donors and activist in the county that in turn would have supported me after we built a relationship.

Podcasting is great from building relationships. Whatever platform do you have where you can take advantage of the commute time around the beltway? According to the US Census Bureau the average time we spend is 25.4 minutes travelling to work. That’s 25.4 minutes of podcast audio your potential audience can learn more about you and your brand in an environment where the other content platforms can’t really go.

When you think about it, when a person is listening to you, your voice is in their earbuds. It’s intimate. You will be able to find common ground with your listener. They will “get you” on a deeper level. When they finally meet you, they will feel as if they have known you for years. That is the power of the connection. You can be personal. And I think you should. You should show your heart. You should and can give them a reason to identify with you.
I know this to be so true that I created a business to provide this service to the busy professional that needs to get their message out.

In addition to connecting with your supporters, podcasting is an amazing platform for you to connect with influencers—people who may possibly donate to your campaign, endorse you or that you may look up to. If you were to go and ask a person who you look up to if you could spend thirty minutes to an hour to speak to you; they might say no. Schedules being what they are…. But the moment you have a podcast, it shows them immediately that you have something to offer them. You have a stage to give them. An audience. An opportunity to speak about themselves and show off their thoughts to an entirely new group of people.

 

And, conversely, you get a chance to gain more listeners of your show and more exposure to your campaign from their audience. By connecting with these influencers, as I mentioned earlier, you are also building a relationship with them; you’re getting to know them better and you’re providing value to them. In return, they’ll likely be able to provide value right back.

All the World is a Stage.

If you were an unknown like me, the stage can be daunting. It is owned by the opposition. It is regulated by the same cast of characters. On your podcast you control the tone, the tempo, the time, everything. You can deliver your message, your way.
The power is also in the niche. Let’s say an NPR style podcast gets 100,000 downloads a show and your new podcast only gets 100. That would seem small accept that those 100 people are your people. They purposely subscribed to your show. They are your disciples. They are your super fans. A room with 100 people is pretty impressive. They can take your message and build a base. You can truly communicate with them and have them share your message with their friends.

Good luck on your next campaign. This works in small business too.

PodcastSolutions.us is a new podcast editing and producing company in Prince Georges County owned by Rev. Kenn Blanchard.

Check out these podcast:  Black Man With A Gun Show ,  Speak Life church , and  Indian Motorcycle radio  The Books, Kenn has written.
You, Me, and Police Shootings: The Truth

You, Me, and Police Shootings: The Truth

“The Second Amendment is for everyone.” I have to repeat the mantra of fellow former US Marine, gun rights activist, and podcaster Tony Simon.  I know people that don’t realize they are free. They believe that the US Constitution and the Bill of Rights are subjective. They have allowed injustices to occur because they feel that things don’t apply to them.

A right delayed is a right denied – Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

But where are we collectively as gun rights advocates when it comes to the recent police shootings of Black Men With Guns?  I had a different draft post before I read this article from The Rolling Stones Magazine.

Here’s an excerpt from The “Good Guy With A Gun” is Never Black.”

The lack of ability to imagine black people as heroes may be one explanation for these shootings. That was one of the countless things that James Baldwin was right about. American fiction is a significant contributor to our ideas of heroism both on the page and onscreen, and as the author both wrote and said in 1965, “It comes as a great shock to see Gary Cooper killing off the Indians, and although you are rooting for Gary Cooper, that the Indians are you.” Regardless of color, we all are trained from an early age not merely to synchronize whiteness and heroism, but are fed narratives that discourage us from forming any other conclusion. Barack Obama wasn’t enough to change that, to say nothing of Lando Calrissian, Roger Murtaugh or Axel Foley. Not even T’Challa from Black Panther or Chris from Get Out. A childhood of seeing men of color as cannon fodder for Clint Eastwood, John Wayne and other assorted Good White Guys With Guns has an effect on folks.

Jamil Smith

This article made me remember that I have been here before.  I have thought many times since 1986 about the possibility of being shot myself by a law enforcement officer even after graduating from the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center.  Being pro-gun, African American and a staunch supporter of gun rights doesn’t make me immune.

The accidental death of an African American man in Alabama by a police officer is not news you want to read on Thanksgiving holidays, much less have happen at all.  As a responsible gun owner where should we be in this conversation?

If you are a Black person, the lens in which you look at the recent shootings of Emantic Fitzgerald Bradford Jr, and Jemel Roberson can be different.

I know police are not shooting African Americans for fun and profit.    This stuff still bother us, regardless of color.  Blaming the police broadly is a “cop-out.”

If you are a law enforcement officer  I would dare to say that you hate to hear about this,  knowing that it will make your job even harder than it already is.

Let’s look at the police.  

The police have a difficult job.  They are called to act before all the facts are known in dangerous situations.  They have to basically jump into a crowd of strangers and figure out the good guys from the bad guys.  When they get it wrong someone dies.

Have you ever heard of “Qualified Immunity.”  It is a legal defense where government officials are held harmless if they followed established procedures. It is that established procedure that will be exonerate or incarcerate the police officer in question.  The details won’t make it out of court.  You only will see the drama.  Folks will protest without knowing what was said in court.  Even what you can see on video isn’t ironclad.  There are always circumstances.

I am not excusing anything that has happened.

Police departments that can afford it use simulators to train when to shoot and when not to shoot. This reality based training is extremely useful in exposing weaknesses in police policy and in officer training.  I know for a fact that training is the first thing cut out from a departments budget.  And some people shouldn’t be police officers.

The truth is, you can’t fix stupid.

We hold law enforcement to a different standard but it is not fair.  They are still just people.

The Media

The Media is challenged to report on what will get the most amount of eyes. As consumers, we will change the channel if there is no exciting news. Fear sells.  We like to believe the worst of people before we watch good news so the media broadcasts daily, imagery of dangerous black men, criminals, using and dealing drugs, over-sexed, unemployable, idle and the epitome of death and doom. It is amplified by pop music and underground loving culture and ignorance, that promotes the negative stereotypes.  We have no problem with that.  That is why is it reported on a loop.   It is sensational. Its media worthy.  It divides.  It sells.

Black people have already started the campaign against all police.  That is wrong.

Fear. False Expectation Appearing Real.

 

The racism that everybody always brings up is really based on a fear of loss.  Almost everything we do is based on the fear of loss.  We buy stuff we don’t need because of it.  White supremacy is based on the fear of losing the so-called Whiteprivilege.  Fear of loss touches on almost everything you can name.  This is all because of the psychology of fear.  We are not as free as our Constitution allows.

We fear those different than us.  What was once a defense mechanism is now a flaw.

We are conditioned to fear.  We learn fear.  We are afraid of the unknown. We are afraid that a black man will kill us.  The myth of the predatory Black man has been used to instill fear in whites and to justify their brutality and violence against Black individuals, communities and continents since the 1600’s. The narrative has been passed down from one generation to the next and is still used to underwrite injustice against Black people.

We project this fear.  Have you ever heard of projection?  That is when one accuses someone of having traits they refuse to acknowledge in themselves.

The behavior of people around us also can influence our responses to threats. You ever see people run because everyone else is running?  It is a smart response to crime prevention.

“Fear has a certain contagious feature to it, so the fear in others can elicit fear in ourselves. It’s conditioning.  We come into the world knowing how to be afraid, because our brains have evolved to deal with nature.”

The truth is this is sad.  This has happened before.  Fear and perception cloud our judgements.  Until I started to look “older” I used to cause quite a few people to move fast across the street, lock car doors when I approached or clutch their wallets/purses.  I have been followed in the stores.  I have been accused of “casing” a place while shopping.  This is our society.  I know that all it takes is one bad apple to make us accuse thousands of people in any group.

WTH do we do now?  How can we stop this?  How can we keep our nation together?  How do we stop it from happening tomorrow?

I want to hear your opinions.    But really think about what I said.   The tragic killing of people that scare us, isn’t new.  Don’t restate the problem?   What do you suggest we do to solve this?

 

Check out these podcast:  Black Man With A Gun Show ,  Speak Life church , and  Indian Motorcycle radio  The Books, Kenn has written.
Voodoo Child

Voodoo Child

Solomon Love finds himself in New Orleans after being warned never to go there.  Find out what happens when a werewolf that has been hiding in plain sight for centuries in nightclubs playing the blues finds himself in trouble with the practitioners of Voodoo seeking to kill him and take his life force. Voodoo Child.

new orleans street

Check out these podcast:  Black Man With A Gun Show ,  Speak Life church , and  Indian Motorcycle radio  The Books, Kenn has written.
Where The Moss Grows

Where The Moss Grows

This is the first book of the series.

These are the tales of Solomon Love. Who while escaping American slavery became bound to the world of the supernatural. Now a reclusive blues musician, he is haunted by his past, hunted for his curse and fighting for survival in the present.

swamp

What would happen to a young African musician kidnapped and sold into slavery in North America, seduced by his slave masters Druid daughter, caught and beaten, presumed and left for dead, escapes to the swamps where he is lost but before he dies is bitten by a werewolf in whom he falls in love with? Where The Moss Grows.

 

Check out these podcast:  Black Man With A Gun Show ,  Speak Life church , and  Indian Motorcycle radio  The Books, Kenn has written.

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