7 tips on how to improve your camping experience

As the summer is coming, many of us will enjoy a favorite outdoors activity – camping. It is definitely important to plan ahead, especially if you take your family with you. Nowadays, there are many ways to make your camp life easier, although some of them could cost you a lot. In this article we will share with you some ideas that will help you relax while camping, without seriously affecting your wallet.

1. Have an emergency kit with you.

It is very common to have a first-aid kit in a car, but while camping you should have a survival kit with some additional features handy, such as basic medical equipment, a whistle, a compass, flint and steel. You can create a small box out of Altoid tin which will give you enough space to fit all the necessary items.

2. Prepare your own fire starters.

Considering the changing weather conditions and potential dampness of the wood, creating your own ready-to-use fire starters could really help you avoid unnecessary stress while starting a campfire. All you have to do is to stuff a cardboard paper tube with some dry lint. 

3. Create your own lantern.

Instead of using camping lanterns, which at times can be way too bright, you can make your own lantern with less intense light. Just take a gallon of water and strap the headlamp around it. The light going through the water will be much milder. 

4. Use solar energy to have light at night.

In order to avoid getting lost at night while going to the bathroom, take advantage of solar energy. You can place some outdoor solar lights near your tent, which will definitely help you walk at night without tripping over things. 

5. Make your own mosquito-repelling bracelet.

While sometimes it is impossible to avoid getting bitten by mosquitoes, you can still stop a great majority of them. A Para cord bracelet infused with citronella essential oil will repel these blood-drinking insects, while a Para cord itself can be used in case of some other emergencies. 

6. Take with you ready-to-use eggs.

You can speed up the process of making scrambled eggs by simply doing some of the work at home. The eggs must be cracked into a mason jar, then you have to store them in your cooler. Don’t forget to shake the eggs before you use them.

7. Prepare “shake & pour” pancake batter.

Same as it is with the eggs, you can also make your life easier by using a “shake & pour” pancake batter. Just prepare at home the dry mix and put it in a mason jar. Once you want to make pancakes, simply add an egg and some water. Then shake the jar. 

We are sure that following these tips will save you some time while camping, which instead you can use to simply enjoy your stay in the nature. If you want to find out what else you can do to make camping easier, check outdoor gear reviews on Gear Lobo.

 

 

Disclaimer:
The opinions and or beliefs expressed in this post belong to the author, and are not endorsed or necessarily shared by Kenn Blanchard or other contributors to this site.

 

Celebrating Juneteenth and The Heller Decision

This week on the Black Man With A Gun Show Podcast episode 574 I have an conversation with the guy in whom the Heller Decision is named, Dick Heller. He is funny. I also share some back story that it originally had a black woman and friend of mine, Shelly Parker as the plaintiff. The history of Juneteenth and the importance of it relating to gun rights.

My birthday is six months before Christmas. It is also usually when the US Supreme Court meets and hands down a decision on a landmark case. Ten years ago, the Supreme Court did just that for us in the District of Columbia v. Heller, 554 U.S. 570 (2008), that said:

…that the Second Amendment protects an individual’s right to possess a firearm unconnected with service in a militia for traditionally lawful purposes, such as self-defense within the home, and that Washington, D.C.’s handgun ban and requirement that lawfully-owned rifles and shotguns be kept “unloaded and disassembled or bound by a trigger lock” violated this guarantee. It also stated that the right to bear arms is not unlimited and that guns and gun ownership would continue to be regulated.

To mark that anniversary, I have a conversation with Dick Heller on this weeks podcast.

Michael Woodland talks about the community project. You can support it at http://gofundme.com/m-wtactical

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Juneteenth

It commemorates the emancipation of African-American citizens throughout the country.

American slavery took a chunk out of us that hasn’t healed. Juneenth is a day we should be celebrating freedom.

The word is a combo of the words June and nineteenth. Juneteenth marks the abolition of slavery in the state of Texas on 19 June 1865.

During the American Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on 22 September 1862, to be introduced at the beginning of January 1863. Americans of African ancestry celebrate Watch Night on New Years Eve because of this. It proclaimed the freedom of slaves in the ten states still in rebellion, freeing around 3 million of the 4 million slaves in captivity at the time.

Texas, even after military hostilities had ended, did not comply with the proclamation.

Major General Gordon Granger born in Joy, Wayne County, New York, in 1821 landed at Galveston, Texas with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free. Note that this was two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation – which had become official January 1, 1863. The Emancipation Proclamation had little impact on the Texans due to the minimal number of Union troops to enforce the new Executive Order. However, with the surrender of General Lee in April of 1865, and the arrival of General Granger’s regiment, the forces were finally strong enough to influence and overcome the resistance.

Later attempts to explain this two and a half year delay in the receipt of this important news have yielded several versions that have been handed down through the years. Often told is the story of a messenger who was murdered on his way to Texas with the news of freedom. Another, is that the news was deliberately withheld by the enslavers to maintain the labor force on the plantations. And still another, is that federal troops actually waited for the slave owners to reap the benefits of one last cotton harvest before going to Texas to enforce the Emancipation Proclamation. All of which, or neither of these version could be true. Certainly, for some, President Lincoln’s authority over the rebellious states was in question   For whatever the reasons, conditions in Texas remained status quo well beyond what was statutory.

One of General Granger’s first orders of business was to read to the people of Texas, General Order Number 3 which began:

“The people of Texas are informed that in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and free laborer.”

The reactions to this news ranged from pure shock to immediate jubilation. Some stayed but a lot of folks went north getting off the plantations at first chance.

North was a logical destination because it represented true freedom, while the desire to reach family members in neighboring states drove the some into Louisiana, Arkansas and Oklahoma.

The celebration of June 19th was coined “Juneteenth” and grew with more participation from descendants. The Juneteenth celebration was a time for reassuring each other, for praying and for gathering remaining family members. Juneteenth continued to be highly revered in Texas but not too many other places unfortunately.

On January 1, 1980, Juneteenth became an official state holiday through the efforts of Al Edwards, an African American state legislator. The successful passage of this bill marked Juneteenth as the first emancipation celebration granted official state recognition.  Edwards has since actively sought to spread the observance of Juneteenth all across America.

Sometimes by losing a battle you find a new way to win the war. – Donald Trump

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AirForce AirGuns

air force air gun and kenn blanchard

The ultimate rifle for every urban shooter should be one of the air guns from Airforceairguns.com.

I had the opportunity to review one for you. The one I have is called the Condor SS in .22 caliber. This is a pre-charged pneumatic air rifle. This is an epic rifle that is not a firearm but a serious choice for long range shooting, getting rid of pest and small game hunting.

You know that in a urban and suburban environment a firearm cannot be used to get rid of rats, rabid small game or target practice. You can do all that with this rifle.

The one I have shoots so fast that the lead pellet would have sounded like a .22 going off if it weren’t shot through a suppressed 18-inch barrel. Airforce airguns calls it Sound-Loc® reduction technology. It uses a “pony” like diving tank that locks into place and is a part of the design. I used a full size SCUBA tank to charge it to 2500 PSI. The tank holds 3000 PSI.

I went to Columbia Scuba, in Columbia, Maryland to rent the tank in order to charge the gun. The air went into the special designed nozzle without a hitch in a few minutes.

It has settings that allow you to shoot it and different settings. I had it moderately high and used about 15 single shots before the velocity decrease was noticeable. It still rings my .22 caliber steel target at 50 yards after that. I have shot about 25 shots through it now and have about a 1000 psi left. I know “your mileage may vary” but this gun is epic to me.

I would like to see a shooting club (hint hint) emerge of airforce airgun aficionados appear in my area.

Do you know these things come in different colors?

Features:

  • •.177, .20, .22 or .25 Caliber Lothar Walther Barrel
    •Lightweight
    •Recoilless
    • Pressure Relief Device
    •Adjustable Power
    •Extended Scope Rail
    •Ring-Loc ™ Valve System
    •Available in Blue, Red or Original Black Finishes

Technical Specifications:

•Velocity: 600-1300 feet per second (Depending on caliber, pellet weight, and power setting)
•Power Adjustment: User-adjustable
•Maximum Fill Pressure: 3000 psi / 200 bar (Only use compressed air or dry nitrogen)
•Action: Single shot
•Weight: 6.1 lbs.
•Length: 38.125 inches
•Barrel: 18 inches
•Trigger: 2-stage adjustable for position
•Sights: Open optical sights may be installed
• Air Tank Volume: 490cc
• Safety: Automatic on cocking

I ordered a handful of different types of .22 pellets, hollow point, target, hunting, etc to try out over the next couple of weeks. I’ll let you know what I find out. Right now, I AM LOVING THIS RIFLE.

Airforceairgun.com

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HOW TO STORE GUNS SAFELY IN YOUR HOME

Are you afraid of guns? Or the question should be Are you afraid of intruders? In both cases the answer most probably would be ‘yes’ for most of us. Both are equally scary.

Majority of us has seen firearms only in action movies where it seems cool, fun and full of action, not knowing any of its specifications or the goose bumps we get by its shot sound in reality. We never ever want to handle it manually as for us it’s the tool either for robbers or police chasing each other.

What if we need it equally? For it gives us a sense of security and protection. Ever imagined keeping it at home?

Many of us think it’s vital and dare to keep it for safety measures but Life is not a movie; to own a gun needs a lot of courage, proper knowledge, guidance andprecaution for sure.

1: STORAGE:

It’s imperative to look for a safe place to store a gun, not easily accessible. With the advancement in technology we get more options like Biometric Weapon Safe is a good selection for its fingerprinttechnology as it gives you quick access to your firearm in case of emergency.

Gun vaults are also a good option from protection against burglar’s and kids as well.

2: AMMUNITION:

Never place ammunition with a gun so it can’t be misused without your permission. Be sure to use correct ammunition for your fire arm because improper ammunition can cause you severe injury and damageyour gun as well.

Where ever you keep it, make it safe from heat and moisture. Before handling gun to anyone always check the magazine, that it doesn’t contain any ammunition.

3: UNSAFE STORAGE:

Unsafe domains to keep a gun should never be in a bed room drawer, under a bed, on a shelf or with other expensive items. These are the most common places even for a child to know to grab a gun easily.

In case of robbery, valuables kept with a gun increase the risk of you getting shot.

4: MAKE RULES:

For whatever purpose you use a gun (hunting or practice) make it a rule to always unload it carefully, clean it and finally store it in a safe area in your home.

Hunting rifles should not be proudly displayed or hanged in a showcase or wall; its easy access to everyone adds no less danger to lives. Sometimes people out of rage losing their mind use it, to repent for life.

5: OUT OF CHILDREN’S ACCESS:

Today’s kids are action kids, smarter and have curiousnature especially knowing about a gun at your place will make them brag about it and they will want toaccess it one way or other.

Kids have their perfect dream imagination with their favorite cartoon or movies heroes with gun action. They can’t differentiate between real and fake firearm. It’s better to give them proper guidance about a real gun and its bad results.

Kids learn from actions more than words, create a better example for them being extra cautious dealing with firearms at home.

To keep guns out of reach of kids should be a priority. It’s better to be safe than to be late.

6: DIRECTION:

Never aim your gun at any individual either for fun, acting or mimicking purpose because accidents occur with no warnings. Always point the muzzle of gun to a safe direction. By safe direction mean where the bullet cannot hit anyone, like it can be ‘upward’ direction.

7: UNLOAD THE GUN:

Whenever you store your gun in a safe, it should always be empty.  Unloading your firearm prevents any mishap from occurring and its best to prevent any unauthorized access.

8: GUN HANDLING:

You must know every characteristic about the gun you own, like the gun handling specifications and its mechanicals. You must never fool around; only press the trigger when you are ready to fire. Keep in mind that real gun isn’t the paintball guns or airsoft stuff.

Most of us are not experts at shooting and panic when it’s most needed. Better to keep finger away from trigger to avoid unintentional finger slip unless you intend to shoot or your sights are at target.  Before loading and shooting make sure the barrel is clear of any obstruction.

9: GUN LOCK:

Gunlock is additional safety measure, using it make a fire arm inoperable. The more protection, the more it’sbetter.

Padlocks and cable locks are being used for trigger lock which is also a good option.

10: EDUCATE FAMILY:

Everyone in home must be aware of the dangers of gun use and misuse. Healthy fear is necessary and worth saving lives. Give them proper safety tips and guidelines about arm handling in case of emergency or situation.

Author-Bio

Anthony Maldonado has over Thirty (25) years of experience in the field of guns, hunting, sports and self-defense related fields.Now he keeps on doing it through teaching others about how to do it. He is an expert in the area of DIY. He is presently working at his tenbesttipz.com

Why You Need This Air Gun In Your Life

air force air guns review from kenn blanchard

Podcast

On this weeks show, I will share my review of the Airforceairgun.com Condor SS, .22 cal. Michael J. Woodland introduces us to Kimo Moya of Moyatactical.com. Attorney Andrew Branca gives us a new case in his feature from the Law of Self Defense.

Zen of Airguns Part 2

Airforceairguns.com sent me (blackmanwithagun.com) a Condor SS air rifle to review and I fell in love with it. If you are an “urban shooter,” live in close proximity to others as in a city, suburban, not rural America, one of these rifles is a good addition to your gun safe.

view of the airforce airgun

Features:
• .22 or .25 Caliber Lothar Walther Barrel
• Lightweight
• Recoiless
• Pressure Relief Device
• Adjustable Power
• Extended Scope Rail
• Ring-Loc ™ Valve System
• Black Finish

Technical Specifications:
• Velocity: 600-1300 feet per second (Depending on caliber, pellet weight, and power setting)
• Power Adjustment: User-adjustable
• Maximum Fill Pressure: 3000 psi / 200 bar (Only use compressed air or dry nitrogen)
• Action: Single shot
• Weight: 6.1 lbs.
• Length: 38.125 inches
• Barrel: 18 inches
• Trigger: 2-stage adjustable for position
• Sights: Open optical sights may be installed
• Air Tank Volume: 490cc
• Safety: Automatic on cocking

Unlike the Daisy Red Ryder BB gun I got when I was nine, I had to use and external air supply to charge this rifle. I went to Columbia Scuba, in Columbia, MD to rent a scuba tank. Airforceairguns sent me a device that allowed me to take air from the tank and charge the gun to the recommended capacity not to exceed 3000 PSI.

I was scared to be honest I have never used a tank in this way. It went without a problem. The gun was about the six lbs. I used a picket fence in my yard as a gun rest to shoot at a paper plate and .22 steel target about 50 yards away.

shooting a lead .22 cal. pellet from Crossman with a hollow point. It’s a single shot rifle with some pretty good optics. To shoot I had ago disengage a safety right in front of the trigger guard much like one from an old Garand rifle.

This rifle is cool. It is suppressed because the pellet will come out faster than the speed of sound. It made a sound that sounded like a suppressed .22 bullet. The sound got quieter as the air was used. I shot about twenty plus rounds.

This gun would be good for plinking, collectors, pest control and hunting in the urban environment. It is not a firearm but not a toy either.

For more info go to http://airforceairguns.com

I highly recommend this rifle for all responsible urban shooters.

 

MOYA TACTICAL

Michael interviews James “Kimo” Moya of MoyaTactical.com  Kimo shared because of the popularity of his products, he is asking for your patience on orders.

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The Zen of Airguns, Part One

air force air gun and kenn blanchard

Podcast 569

This week on the podcast I want to introduce a gun that is not a firearm.  Introducing the AirForceAirGuns.com Condor SS that I will be reviewing and the history of airguns.  Remember the Daisy Red Ryder?  This is the beginning of a project I am working on for folks in the urban environment to get one of these pro airguns.  Andrew Branca’s feature on the Law of Self Defense is from a 2014 case talking use of force and our martial arts.  Michael talks about how important fitness is to one that uses firearms.  Barbara Baird shares some inside info on the Smith & Wesson Bodyguard .380 pistol.  And I share some news and commentary.  

When is a gun not a firearm?

From a legal definition (in 46 of 50 US states) All firearms are guns but not all guns are firearms.

A firearm is a mechanical device that uses pressure from a burning powder or an explosive charge to force a projectile through and out of a metal tube; a weapon, especially a pistol or rifle, capable of firing a projectile and using an explosive charge as a propellant.

But there are also air rifles and pistols, which are commonly called BB guns or pellet guns, but which are not commonly called “firearms,” since they use compressed air or CO2, not gunpowder to propel the projectile. There are also toy guns, such as airsoft or paintball, so gun is a more general or broad term that could be applied even to toys, which look like firearms, but are not.

What Is an Air gun

A airgun (rifle or handgun) that launches projectiles by means of compressed air or other gas such as carbon dioxide.
The Red Ryder BB Gun is a BB gun made by Daisy Outdoor Products and introduced in the spring of 1940 that resembles the Winchester rifle of Western movies.[5] Named for the comic strip cowboy character Red Ryder (created in 1938, and who appeared in numerous films between 1940 and 1950, and on television in 1956), the BB gun is still in production, though the comic strip was cancelled in 1963.
The year was 1886. France had just given the bright copper Statue of Liberty to the United States. Coca-Cola had just been invented and was only available as a syrup mixed with soda water. The Plymouth Iron Windmill Company in Plymouth, Michigan, just outside of Detroit, had for four years been making iron windmills for farmers. However a premium item, given free to farmers who purchased these windmills, was about to change that company’s destiny.

Windmill sales did not take off as expected and the company came close in 1888 to liquidating. The vote failed by one vote – that of General Manager Lewis Cass Hough. While the “Chicago” air rifle–made almost entirely of wood – had been made since 1885 by the Markham Air Rifle Company of Plymouth, Hamilton was the first to develop a metal air rifle. After firing the gun (first at a basket of red-ink covered paper and then an old shingle), Hough exclaimed in the slang of the time, “Boy, that’s a Daisy!” and later convinced the Board of Directors to use the metal air rifle as a premium item.

The popularity of the premium item was huge. Farmers were more interested in the “Daisy” than the windmill– so much so that the focus of the company shifted from windmills to airguns. By 1890, the twenty-five employees of Plymouth Iron Windmill Company were producing 50,000 guns, most of which were distributed within a radius of one hundred miles of the factory.

red ryder daisy bb gun ad

From a technical point of view, any gun that launches projectiles utilizing compressed gas rather than producing gases burning a propellant (powder) is considered to be an “air” gun. In some cases, the propelling gas may be carbon dioxide in which case the gun is actually a “gas” gun, but the term airgun is still generally applied to them. One of the great American airgun designs is the multi-pump (sometimes called a “pump up” gun) in which air is compressed by a series of pump strokes. When the gun is fired, the compressed air enters the breech behind the projectile driving it forward. This type of rifle has been produced for well over a century, and with a maximum number of pump strokes, some of these rifles are powerful enough to be useful tools in hunting.

http://airforceairguns.com

Compact and sleek, the M&P BODYGUARD 380 delivers personal protection in an easy-to-carry, comfortable platform. Chambered for .380 ACP, the lightweight pistol features a high-strength polymer frame with a black, matte-coated stainless-steel slide and barrel. The new M&P BODYGUARD 380 retains original design features including a 2 ¾-inch barrel, which contributes to an overall length of 5 ¼ inches and an unloaded weight of only 12.3 ounces making it perfectly suited for concealed carry.  Lightweight, and simple to use – nothing protects like a BODYGUARD.

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Enough

I’ve had it.  I had hoped it was just an anomaly the first time.  But it seems like every time I get on the internet, there has been another one, and one more is too many.  Now, it is time for us to accept some reasonable restrictions, and enact some commonsense reforms.

And don’t go waving the Bill of Rights in my face.  The farsighted Founders of our great nation never envisioned atrocities like this, and I am sick and tired of it.  I do not believe for a moment that the eloquent, educated men who wrote our Constitution ever intended the First Amendment to protect the use of the words “booger hook” and “bang switch”.

Just stop it.

It sounded sort of clever the first time I heard it a couple of decades ago, for about two minutes.  But I’m pretty sure that using playground words instead of professional and correct terminology doesn’t really help make the case that we in the gun community take ourselves or our hardware seriously.  It’s time to grow up, and speak like adults.  So next time you need to show what a savvy gun person you are and lecture about how not to shoot yourself, remember…

This is a finger.

 

This is a trigger.

 

Use your words…

Thinkable

Image: KTRK-TV

“It is with great sadness that I stand here today to share with you that we experienced an unthinkable tragedy at our high school this morning.”

–  Dr. Leigh Wall, Santa Fe ISD

To be fair, it is entirely possible that Dr. Wall did not mean “unthinkable” in the literal sense. Still, I think it is worth addressing the use of that word when it comes to mass murder in a school…or any other act of violence, for that matter. While violent crime is thankfully unfamiliar to the vast majority of America (386.3 offenses for every 100,000 people) , no one with access to a television, a radio, a computer, or smartphone should be in denial of the possibility.

Anyone who steps out their door in the morning truly believing “it can’t happen here” is a fool. Furthermore, if you are in some sort of position which entrusts you with responsibility for the lives of others and you still believe “it can’t happen here,” you are both negligent and morally bankrupt.

Although there were armed officers present today, and by all accounts they performed admirably, no law-abiding adult should be denied the right to defend themselves immediately from violence…right now. While prevention is certainly preferable, I know of no one who has a realistic proposal to guarantee that such violence can be prevented without fail. And once the killing begins, prevention is no longer an option. History has proven again and again that the longer it takes for an armed defender to arrive at the scene, the more people die.

If you are a leader…in a school system, a business, or any other organization…and you sit safe in your office while those in your charge are left vulnerable, you are wrong. It is one thing to opt for defenselessness for yourself, but to force others to be so is wrong. “Gun-free zones” are wrong. “Gun-free zones” kill.

Unthinkable, my ass. You had better think about it.

Image: KTRK-TV

You Don’t Need To Hunt

A recent article on Huffpost, by alleged hunters, is repeating the old narrative that the only guns which merit any protection are those which are deemed necessary for hunting. After all, they say, you just don’t need an AR-15 to hunt. Big mistake, Elmer.

 

Never mind that the 2nd Amendment has nothing to do with hunting, and never mind the obvious arguments against living in a society where you are only allowed to possess the things which you need (as decided by someone else).  Let’s stick to the idea that you only need guns which are suitable for hunting, because there is a very specific problem with that position.

The problem is that once need becomes the linchpin of your position, you now open up the debate as to whether or not you really need to hunt at all. And you know what? You don’t.

There are very few people left in this country who require hunted game meat to feed themselves, if any. We hunt because we enjoy the activity, and because we like game meat, but we don’t need it any more than we need a new Xbox. And if you really want to argue the case that you and your family need hunted game meat in order to survive, I’ve got a solution for you…and you aren’t going to like it.

It involves means testing before being allowed to hunt for subsistence. If your income as reported to the IRS does not fall below the poverty line, then you do not qualify as a subsistence hunter. Remember, the only allowable guns are those suitable for hunting, and since your income level means you do not need to hunt, you may possess no firearms at all.

The next phase of the solution comes once all the non-subsistence hunters and their nasty old non-hunting guns are weeded out. Now we have a relatively small subset of impoverished gun owners who simply cannot afford to buy meat at the grocery to feed their families. It then becomes a simple matter to put them on government assistance (if they aren’t already) and bump their allowance enough to enable them to buy their meat at the supermarket like everybody else.

The supposed need to hunt has now been removed once and for all. Now, not only have the awful guns no one needed to hunt been eliminated, the so-called “good guns” are unnecessary as well. Once you put need into the equation, you are one government-issued EBT card away from no longer needing to hunt. There’ll be no tasty venison for you, but you won’t starve. And once you no longer need to hunt, you won’t need any of those guns at all, Elmer.

Turn Out The Lights

The party’s over…at least for me and the Sig Sauer P320RX Compact. I don’t typically do gun review stuff here, but I think this is worth sharing. I bought this gun about six months ago, looking to make the switch not just from iron sights to a red dot, but from a relatively low-capacity pistol to one with more ammunition on board.

 

 

After about a month of every day carry, I picked up the gun one morning and the red dot simply would not come on. Sig utilizes a technology they call MOTAC, which shuts down the reticle after two minutes of inactivity in order to preserve the battery. Then when the sight senses motion, the dot immediately reactivates. Of course, if you are carrying the pistol on your person for 10-12 hours per day (or more), the reticle remains on constantly, consuming power from the battery. I replaced the battery with a fresh one, and the sight came back to life with no problems. As I continued to carry and shoot the gun, I was finding that the dot was dying on me about once per month.

 

In a fantastic IWB holster from JM Custom Kydex

 

This bothered me, because it seemed a bit too frequent for a carry pistol, and I wanted more information on battery life. This is obviously a critical consideration in a carry pistol, since you need to be 100% comfortable that the gun will function in the event that it is needed in a defensive situation. And although the P320RX does have backup iron sights…well, I already had an iron-sighted carry gun, and I didn’t buy a gun with an optic in order to keep shooting with irons. Since I still really didn’t have a good feel for what sort of battery life I should expect, I did not have the confidence I thought I should. So when I went to the NRA Annual Meeting in Dallas, I sought out a representative of Sig Sauer who was knowledgeable on the Romeo 1 red dot, and asked him what his recommendation was regarding battery life in a daily carry gun.

Unfortunately, his answer didn’t inspire the confidence I was seeking. When I explained my concerns to him, and asked for a recommended battery change interval, he advised that for a daily carry gun the battery should be changed every 2-3 weeks. That’s 26 batteries per year based on the bi-weekly replacement schedule, and while the 1632 battery that the Romeo 1 isn’t terribly expensive if bought in bulk, I just don’t think I want to fool with that.

Don’t get me wrong. I like the gun itself, and although I was still getting used to shooting an optic-sighted pistol, I did like having the dot. If you don’t mind keeping track of bi-weekly battery changes, maybe this won’t be an issue for you. But for me…for now…I have to conclude that the Sig Sauer P320RX and its Romeo 1 optic are too high maintenance, and not quite ready for primetime. Maybe someday Sig will come out with an improved version with better battery life; maybe someday I’ll buy a replacement slide with iron sights and use that. I will probably keep shooting the gun in USPSA Carry Optics for the rest of this season, but as a concealed carry gun, I don’t think it works for me right now. Time to turn out the lights…