Category: Podcasting

#howto, #podcasting, #podcast marketing, producing, how to make money from podcasting, how to do it better than anyone else

Internet Pastor

Internet Pastor

Many may have wondered how a “reverend” can have a site like this.  It makes sense if you know me.  I am an advocate for peace, love, family and good citizenship.  I believe in the Gospel of Jesus Christ.  I am a protector of life.  I enjoy shooting firearms recreationally.  I have been trained to use various weaponry as a vocation.  I use this site to reach those like me and those are not to support these things.  I am the founder of an internet ministry called Speak Life Church, Inc.  I have a different take on what it means to be an internet pastor.

Before COVID-19 changed the way churches were operating, the Speak Life Church was created to be a continuation of the ministry of the Apostle Paul using technology. Church and fellowship is not about the building you are in, it is about learning and growing closer to Jesus. It is about building friendships and a community. Through the website, podcasting, video, live streaming and social media, people can be reached that do not feel at home in a traditional church. However, Speak Life is not all about technology. Phone calls, personal visits and meet ups are also a huge part of fellowship and are an even larger part of the roadmap for the church.  

 

Online ministry is misunderstood.  It was a novelty prior to the 2020 pandemic. Prior to this most pastors were not interested to learn how to podcast, use Youtube and use the growing number of video teleconferencing programs to outreach.   It was sad but when this season of our lives hit.  I was ready.  

I know how Noah must have felt.

Today, all are interested in using their gifts in a time when social distancing is done for your own protection. The churches with audio visual and social media managers are hardly missing a beat now that everyone has to broadcast via the web.  The challenges now are which services to use.  The learning curve for some of  platforms are not easy.  Technology is not always user friendly.  Many of the senior and smaller churches are not having success finding where their members are.  Not everyone is on Facebook or Youtube.  And the audience they are trying to reach is unfamiliar with social media.  

 

Mission:  To restore and strengthen the family, provide hope for those in need and offer a non-traditional place of worship, using technology to be anywhere. All are welcome, including those souls still searching for what they believe in.

 

The title of internet pastor is relatively new but this outreach Gospel ministry is striving to be a continuation of the ministry of the Apostle Paul using technology. It still requires face to face ministry.  It still requires contact.  It is still church.  We need connectivity.

Fellowship is not about the building you are in, it is about learning and growing closer to Jesus. It is about building friendships and a community. Through the website, podcasting, video, live streaming and social media, people can be reached that do not feel at home in a traditional church. However, Speak Life is not all about technology. Phone calls, personal visits and meet ups are also a huge part of fellowship and are an even larger part of the roadmap for the church.  

Currently, Rev. Blanchard also officiates weddings, conducts funerals and provides pastoral service nationally to individuals, couples and families unaffiliated with local churches. The Lord has called him to provide a way to feed the Spirit, find the hurting, teach and reach people online.

Here are some of our successes:

  • Helped prevent five suicides
  • Saved several marriages
  • Organized charitable fundraisers for good causes
  • Saved the home of a terminally ill veteran
  • Provided fishing trip and ministry to a senior citizen in hospice care
  • Officiated at 8 weddings

 

Speak Life Church Inc, has partnered with St. Matthew Baptist Church, in District Heights, MD for baptisms, funerals and anything concerning the body of Christ. 

The weekly podcast can be found at SpeakLIfePodcast.com 

Speak Life Church is an IRS 501 (c)3 recognized religious charity, incorporated in the State of Maryland in 2018.   

This weeks episode can be found here:

Giving Links

https://giv.li/p2nj61

 

https://paypal.com/us/fundraiser/charity/3587637

 

https://www.patreon.com/speaklifechurchpodcast

 

You can support the ministry by check or money order by sending it to Speak Life Church, PO BOX 2, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772

Check out these podcast:  Black Man With A Gun Show ,  Speak Life church , and  Indian Motorcycle radio  The Books, Kenn has written.
Sitting in the Dark- Speak Life Podcast

Sitting in the Dark- Speak Life Podcast

Luke 1:79 – To give light to them that sit in darkness and [in] the shadow of death, to guide our feet into the way of peace.

You ever sat in darkness?

Maybe it was unintentional. Maybe it was brief. What is phenomenal about us is that we can get used to anything. If you start living in a cold house, when you visit someone that has the heat up to 80 degrees you freak out. You are used to less temperature.

I was at work recently, and had a stomach issue. Had to go to the rest room like the house was on fire. You know what mean? I am in there. went to handicap stall because it was bigger. This restroom has a bunch of stalls but they are tight. I thought I might be in there awhile so I wanted to be able to breath and not be right next to the next guy playing the tuba.

so I am just sitting there. minding my own business. and I notice how cold it is in there. So I thought, if I wasn’t all the way to the wall in the handicapped stall, I might not be cold. That is what I get I thought. Then the lights went out.

The restroom had one of those energy saving motion detecting sensors connecting the lights. Nobody was there. I am sitting alone, on the porcelain throne, no phone, no magazine, cold and in the dark.

The Lord said, you know this is biblical. I started smiling and said Lord, you got jokes. Where is this in the Bible? I’ll show you when you get out of here. Ok I said. is this one of those “I am the light of hte world,” refs. He said no, wait. I aint going no where. You could cut the light on for me couldn’t you? nope, nothing. You funny Lord.

In my best Al Pacino voice, I said, I’m in the dark, heer….” then I started laughing.

Then I thought, I am not going to remember this to share it. But then I thought about how and why the Lord spoke to me today vs yesterday. What did I do differently? I remembered my prayer this morning on my way to work. I had put myself in right relationship again. I had done the right thing.

Ok, I’ll just wait till he hits me up again and gives me the Scripture. God is ever present. God is always there but we are not always ready, or in the right position to recieve Him.

So I went to the Bible and said ok, Lord, here I am, show me what you working with! He took me to Luke 1:79, a small snippet of Jesus, life, prophesizing what He was about to do.

Luke 1:79 – To give light to them that sit in darkness and [in] the shadow of death, to guide our feet into the way of peace.

SO there I was sitting in darkness.

I am here to let you know that Jesus was sent by God to give light to us. to guide our feet to a way of peace.

Be careful that you don’t get used to the dark that is in the world. You are not of the World if you are a child of God. 1 Thessalonians 5:5 – Ye are all the children of light, and the children of the day: we are not of the night, nor of darkness.

During the Christmas season, the days of darkness are long. There are more creepy, horror stories now, than at Halloween. The pagan holiday of Winter Soltice was replaced by Christmas on purpose to bring the Hope of Christ to darkness.

John 11:10 – But if a man walk in the night, he stumbleth, because there is no light in him.

Please embrace the Light. There are good things, godly things, still even in this fallen society and culture. Think on these things. Perpetuate and accentuate the positives. Be the light in your office. Be the light in your home. Watch your tongue and don’t be the one that people don’t want to be around because no one knows what is going to come out of your mouth.

“What does it mean to walk in the light?”

…to “walk in the light” is a common metaphor within Christian culture. It is often taken to mean “acting correctly” or even “living openly.” Biblically, however, the phrase has the idea of relinquishing sin by following Jesus.

The only Old Testament occurrence of this precise phrase is in Isaiah 2:5, “O house of Jacob, come and let us walk in the light of the Lord.” The Psalms contain similar phrases (56:13; 89:15), as does Isaiah (9:2; 50:10-11; 59:9).

In the New Testament, “walking in the light” is directly related to following Jesus, who said, “I am the light of the world. He who follows me shall not walk in darkness, but have the light of life” (John 8:12). While this verse does not directly say, “Walk in the light, i.e., Jesus,” it does pointedly warn of doing the opposite; therefore, those who follow Jesus are “walking in the light.”

To “walk” is, in short, to live one’s life. One’s lifestyle or way of life can be considered a “walk.” The word also indicates progress. Walking is related to growth; it is taking steps toward maturity. “Light” in the Bible can be a metaphor for life, happiness, righteousness, or understanding. The Bible is clear that light comes from the Lord God, the “Father of the heavenly lights” (James 1:17). He is the opposite of evil. Putting it all together, “walking in the light” means “growing in holiness and maturing in the faith as we follow Jesus.”

Check out these podcast:  Black Man With A Gun Show ,  Speak Life church , and  Indian Motorcycle radio  The Books, Kenn has written.
Grandmas Gun

Grandmas Gun

My maternal grandmother introduced me to the history of the Second Amendment and busted the myth of gun control. Her annual ritual of celebratory gun fire gave me the true origin of Watch Night.

Grandma was not a gun rights advocate, or a politician. She and my ailing grandfather lived in poverty about 500 yards from the Virginia border of North Carolina on a small farm. Historically it was the same location that Nat Turner ran through and hid after becoming a fugitive for fighting slavery and leading a four-day rebellion of both enslaved and free black people in Southampton County, Virginia, in 1831. It was remote, rural and poor.

Grandmas was the orphanage for our family. Her barn was the storehouse for baby items, and furniture. Instead of selling stuff, our families brought it here if it could be reused by a new parent, newlywed or member of the family needing to start out. Except for the baby cribs, most of it was never reused. It was just junk.

My grandparents raised hogs, chickens, ducks, and rabbits and had a garden. Only two neighbors. The closest was 500 yards down the road on one side. The other was the hunting lodge a mile in the other direction.

No indoor toilets, (we had an outhouse and chamber pots) no showers, drafty in the winter, blazing hot in the summers, it was going back in time.

My grandfather suffered a stroke early in my life and walked with a cane. He was slightly disabled, but still worked the farm when able, and then there was grandma who took care of us all.

It was the best time of my life.

A small pond / swamp also was connected to the property which was my playground growing up. Dish and bathwater were dumped into this place. There was a grapevine at the end of the property that was the home of bees, and all manner of creeping things.

It was in this home that I first saw my grandmother use the shotgun that sat behind the wood burning stove in the kitchen all my life.

My understanding of the Second Amendment, and gun ownership began with that shotgun. It was naturally camouflaged by rust, age and dirt. It was probably a Sears Roebuck 12-gauge 101 shotgun for the collectors.

It was that shotgun that became the base of my pro-gun stance. For people that are ignorant about guns that was what I was exposed to because of my grandmother. It was unlocked, loaded and accessible gun in a kitchen, with 3-10 grandchildren in the house at any time. No accidents, no fear of it. We respected our grandparents. We respected their home, rules and gun.

One summer that I spent there as a child amped up my appreciation of arms and my grandmother. While playing near the swamp, a four foot water moccasin came out of the water to dry itself and warm up. I was just standing there when it came out of the water. Water moccasins are an aggressive species of poisonous snake also known as the Cottonmouth. When it found its spot on the bank, it didn’t want any crap from a young kid like me. It hissed, bared its fangs and stood up to make itself look bigger.

It worked because it scared the crap out of me. I screamed. SNAKE! Grandma- Snake! It was then that I saw the marksmanship of my grandmother.

Except for New Year’s, which I will share with you next, I didn’t know if my grandmother could use the gun. I don’t remember my age but I know when she came to the screen door and saw the snake about six feet away from me, she went into mama bear mode.

“What do you want boy” she said looking through the screen door on the back porch. She saw me, she saw the snake and went back in the house.

Grandma I yelled again, not wanting to be left alone. I didn’t know she saw my predicament.

She came back in seconds. I was a first relieved and then I got worried. She had that old shotgun and started walking toward me.

The first thing I thought of was, she is old. What if she can’t shoot? She ain’t the Rifleman. She might shoot me. But that is how she walked. Like the rifleman straight at me.

No grandma no I said quietly,

Steadily walking toward me…

She mounted the shotgun into her shoulder like a soldier, looking down the barrel and without warning fired a shot which expertly disintegrated the black snake. Parts of which went back into the swamp.

The noise of the shotgun made me jump. After I looked at where the snake should have been all I saw was the back of grandma going back into the house, going back to whatever grandmas do, not even phased or concerned.

I just stood there, mouth opened, still in shock from the whole event. I wasn’t shot, she kept me from being bit, she had fired an old shotgun from what I realized today was a good distance on the move.

YAY Grandma!

The second time I saw the shotgun move from behind the stove was during hunting season. It was a cold morning, during my Christmas break and a truck load of white men drove onto the farm unannounced. By the time a couple of them approached the outer door, Grandma had the shotgun in hand as she opened the door to greet them. They never knew it but she was armed.

With practiced “sweetness” she answered the door, ready to defend us if necessary. The white men were just as polite and apologized for the interruption and offered “Ms Mary” some venison should they be lucky today. It was in exchanges like that I saw examples of how an armed society was a polite society. I think that is a podcast somewhere.

And then finally the annual event that reminds me of my grandma’s shotgun was watch night otherwise known as New Year’s Eve.

For some people making noise, and popping corks is the extent of celebrating the New Years’ revelry but I want to share with you what it meant to an African American woman born before women were allowed to vote, the Titanic sank, and during the time when people of color were discouraged from voting. Someone who was a child during the conflict of WWI, and Virginia’s alcohol prohibition.

My great grandparents where the first generation to celebrate the experience what was first called Freedoms Eve.

You see, New Year’s Eve used to be a special occasion in African American culture. Celebratory gunfire meant more than noise making. Freed men owned guns, slaves did not.

Let’s go back to December 31, 1862. After the Union Army was victorious at the Battle of Antietam on September 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued a preliminary proclamation that declared that all slaves in “any state or designated part of a state . . . In rebellion against the United States shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free.” Many blacks in the North and South as well as both free and enslaved blacks anxiously waited for Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation to become effective on January 1, 1863.

Wide eyed with anticipation, many African Americans dared not sleep throughout the late night hours because they wanted to watch “the night turn into a new dawn.” As they watched, many slaves reflected on their hardships and toils, mourned the memory of their ancestors and loved ones who died in slavery, and spent time thanking and praised God for allowing them and their descendants to watch the night of captivity pass.

The chains of poverty, racism, and discrimination have acted as constricting shackles for many African Americans throughout the course of the century following emancipation. Being only quasi-free and given the illusion of equality, many African Americans derived hope from the well spring of their faith as they struggled for the realization of God’s perfect will for true liberation and justice

But this wasn’t universal. Many African Americans want “to distance themselves from the more painful and degrading aspect of the race’s collective past,” as they feel that celebrating emancipation kept the memory of slavery alive. After 1870, and even continuing into the twentieth century, many African Americans advocated halting Freedom Day commemorations. It is rarely even mentioned in church services.

Shooting a gun wasn’t allowed for many of us. We have culturally added prohibitions on ourselves to prevent our children from being lynched, or jailed. This self-inflicted behavior is from the Black Codes. The first gun control law in Virginia was circa 1639 where the General Assembly of Virginia specifically excludes blacks from the requirement of possessing arms.

Black codes were restrictive laws designed to limit the freedom of African Americans and ensure their availability as a cheap labor force after slavery was abolished during the Civil War. Though the Union victory had given some 4 million slaves their freedom, the question of freed blacks’ status in the postwar South was still very much unresolved. Under black codes, many states required blacks to sign yearly labor contracts; if they refused, they risked being arrested, fined and forced into unpaid labor. Outrage over black codes helped undermine support for President Andrew Johnson and the Republican Party.

The end of slavery in 1865 did not eliminate the problems of racist gun control laws; the various Black Codes adopted after the Civil War required blacks to obtain a license before carrying or possessing firearms or Bowie knives; these are sufficiently well-known that any reasonably complete history of the Reconstruction period mentions them. These restrictive gun laws played a part in the efforts of the Republicans to get the Fourteenth Amendment ratified, because it was difficult for domestic terrorist aka night riders (KKK) to generate the correct level of terror in a victim who was returning fire. It does appear, however, that the requirement to treat blacks and whites equally before the law led to the adoption of restrictive firearms laws in the South that were equal in the letter of the law, but unequally enforced.

High Court rules has no power to stop KKK members from disarming blacks. In United States v. Cruikshank, 92 U.S. at 548-59 (1875) A member of the KKK, Cruikshank had been charged with violating the rights of two black men to peaceably assemble and to bear arms. The U.S. Supreme Court held that the federal government had no power to protect citizens against private action (not committed by federal or state government authorities) that deprived them of their constitutional rights under the 14th Amendment. The Court held that for protection against private criminal action, individuals are required to look to state governments. “The doctrine in Cruikshank, that blacks would have to look to state government for protection against criminal conspiracies gave the green light to private forces, often with the assistance of state and local governments, that sought to subjugate the former slaves and their descendants… With the protective arm of the federal government withdrawn, protection of black lives and property was left to largely hostile state governments.” (GLJ, p. 348.)

When I was a kid, all my heroes had guns. Around Christmas time that was all I wanted. All the popular TV shows had guys with trademarked guns. Cowboys, spies, cops, cartoons, and soldiers all had cool guns.

Oh yeah and my grandma.

Check out these podcast:  Black Man With A Gun Show ,  Speak Life church , and  Indian Motorcycle radio  The Books, Kenn has written.
Hope in God – Speak Life Podcast 113

Hope in God – Speak Life Podcast 113

Psalm 42:5 King James Version (KJV)

Why art thou cast down, O my soul? and why art thou disquieted in me? hope thou in God: for I shall yet praise him for the help of his countenance.

Episode 113 – Speak Life Podcast

This is the podcast that never made it. I will figure out how to get it onto Pandora and all the other players that my friends are using to listen to the http://Speaklifepodcast.com.

The subject is about hope this week.

The hope as I am speaking of today is based on the strength of his faithfulness. God has never failed me. I have failed Him. I have not given him props for what He has done for me. I have done stupid stuff in his presence and acted like He didn’t see it. I have blasphemed. I have done all manner of evil. And even on my best day, I have fallen short of the Good that He is.

But God, so loved me that He gave me a million chances to get it right. I had to first acknowledge that He is God. I had to acknowledge and accept the gift that He gave me in the person of Jesus of Nazareth. I had to ask for forgiveness, based on the sacrifice of his Son. To take the place of my mistakes in His presence. I had to repent in my heart, in my spirit that I know I don’t deserve this but gladly and willing accept it. And then claim Him. My God, My Father, My savior, mine.

And that starts your relationship. I had to get things in order. And its not one way. when I moved toward God, HE moved towards me. He was always there I just didn’t know it. He helped me before I could speak the right words.

He let me know I was on the right path. I had to start learning His ways. I had to start being sensitive to the move of the Spirit in my life. it was a growth thing. I still mess up but He is quick to correct me and I can tell when its Him now and not me or the world.

I started looking at things, and people different. That is my hope for you.

So how do you get Hope in God or anyone for that matter. We grow confident based on past performance, knowing their character, having confident expectations. Expectations is the event that is considered most likely to happen.

But if you don’t have a relationship with someone, do you know them? Can you count on them? Do you have any confidence is a stranger?

I don’t think so.

Based on that logic; why do you ask God all the time for stuff when you have no relationship with Him? You know of Him? But do you know Him for yourself?

psalm 42:5 ESV

Why are you cast down, O my soul,
and why are you in turmoil within me?
Hope in God; for I shall again praise him,
my salvation

And in case you didn’t know, my twelve year old iMac gave up the ghost this month. I lost all my special effects, music beds and work flow for podcasting. I know I should have backed it up. And I had another laptop that is almost as old that is failing too and is too full of junk to allow anything new. I have a couple of links for fundraisers here. If you can please consider helping me.
Donate here

https://paypal.com/us/fundraiser/charity/3587637

Gofundme for the computer campaign is here.

Thank you.

Kenn

Check out these podcast:  Black Man With A Gun Show ,  Speak Life church , and  Indian Motorcycle radio  The Books, Kenn has written.

Thanks For Visiting