Option for Spare Magazine Carry – A Vital Aspect of the Concealed-Carry System (The Gideon)

The process of selecting the concealed carry firearm that is best suited for you is a daunting task to say the least. An even more monumental task might be the selection of a method of carry. Not only do discussions of such things spark heated debate among your friends and personal insults from our childish brothers and sisters, but these decisions force you to be more aware, than you ever wanted to be, of how your body shape dictates comfort. You also have to consider your wardrobe, the nature of your career, and pay close attention to the time you spend sitting and standing as you progress through your day. I apologize if this dialogue has caused you to recall the painful memory of working the kinks out of your concealed carry system, but I am happy to say that I have some good news about a vital component of your system.

 

If you have made the decision to carry a firearm, one of the things that is agreed upon, by most competent instructors, is the necessity to carry a spare magazine. The most obvious advantage to carrying a spare magazine is that it is an additional source of ammunition. Further, of all the potential complications that could occur with a firearm, the quickest and easiest to fix is a magazine problem (throw it away and grab another). With that said, there are several options available for carrying a spare magazine; IWB, OWB, and ankle just to name a few, but my favorite method is to carry it in the off-side pants pocket.

 

My pursuit to find a well-made holster for this application led me on a survey of the websites maintained by many reputable holster manufacturers. In the last few months I have used the Galco PMC Pocket Magazine Carrier and the Milt Sparks PCH-M, both of which are well made and very nice, but my personal preference between the two is the Milt Sparks holster. I can’t overstate the quality of the holster! Having said that, the problem is that at a price point of $65.50 and a wait time of up to 18 weeks, it is difficult for me to justify purchasing multiple variations of the holster to suit different firearms. My affinity to the Milt Sparks holster initiated a search for a similar product at a lower price point, which was concluded at www.crossbreedholsters.com with the discovery of The “Gideon” Pocket Mag Carrier.

 

This holster is made to fit magazines for 166 different firearms (according to my personal quick count), is available in 5 different colors, and has an approximate two-week order fulfillment time, all at a price point of $24.95! What more could I ask for?! As a fan of Crossbreed products, I had no reason to doubt the quality of the product, and therefore, ordered three different carriers. I have been carrying them in my pocket for the last 30 days, and so far, it has not disappointed. The leather and stitching are of the highest quality, and the design of the product leaves plenty of room in my pocket for additional every day necessities.

 

If you’re looking for a solid product in which to carry a spare magazine in a pocket, I can highly recommend that you consider The “Gideon” Pocket Mag Carrier as you advance in your pursuit of your ideal concealed carry system.

 

crossbreedholsters.com
crossbreedholsters.com

 

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Ray Price: Winter in America

We are the people of a divided nation. I feel less safe than I have ever felt before. There is a chill in the air.

 

I’m worried. I’m worried that we as a nation are further apart than ever. The gap keeps widening and we begin to collapse from within. I’m worried that the actions of some police officers will lead to distrust amongst our protectors.

 

Law enforcement is our watchmen but who watches them? I’m worried as a young black armed male that if a police officer pulls me over will I be safe?

 

I have been pulled over before by a police officer for a routine traffic stop. I immediately grabbed my license from my wallet and placed it above my visor. I then placed my hands on the steering wheel until the police officer approached me and instructed me to obtain my proper documentation.

 

I didn’t feel complied to tell the officer I had a license to carry permit and that I was armed. I want to be as cooperative with law enforcement as possible and allow them to do their job. Just like me, law enforcement officers just want to do their jobs and go home. Because of the recent tragic events involving the deaths of two black men and the deaths and injuries of law enforcement officers nationwide as a direct result, we as a nation need to stand with law enforcement.

 

Law enforcement officers need our support right now. They are not our threat. As a young black man, I also have to protect myself against the savages of my city. The savages are the ones that seek to commit crimes and cause harm. The savages of my city are a bigger threat to my family and I than the police.

 

They are the real predators not our law enforcement. The nation has become colder. People are angry. People are frightened. I’m angry but that’s why we have communities to help make changes.

 

“Common blood flows through common veins and common eyes all see the same”

 

Lyrics from Gill Scott Heron still hold value today. Now more than ever we need to stand together.

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Concealed Carry as a Young Minority

Six pack or a revolver? That was an easy choice for me. When I turned 21, the last thing I wanted to do was spend my day at a bar. I wanted to spend my day at my local firearms dealer. My father accompanied me when I purchased my first gun, the same place he purchased his first gun. Together we spent months looking at all the handguns. I saved my hard earned cash up and couldn’t wait until I was able to purchase my first handgun. I have been around handguns since I could remember and been shooting since I was 12. I was even on the high school rifle team, but this was my own gun. With it not only came great responsibility but also great fear. I brought my concealed carry permit that same day, but was I ready to carry?

Life changes when you carry a live gun on your hip and you’re out in public. It’s different from getting your first car. You get your first car and drive off the lot. You can’t wait for your friends to see you in your new car. Your excitement is running through your body but you buy your car and forget about what it is capable of doing. You forget that your new car can instantly become a weapon and can take you or someone else’s life. When I carried my gun for the first time I felt it on me. It was awkward and heavy.

I reminisce at times when I recall my first time carrying a firearm. It felt weird and wrong because I was the first person my age who I knew that carried a gun and in the beginning I felt like I was breaking a law. As a minority, I felt even more cautious. I never saw stories of black concealed carry people defending themselves in the newspaper or television but I saw black people committing crimes with firearms. It also illustrated a stereotype that black people who had a gun were criminals. I knew that wasn’t true but most people see a young black male carrying a gun as trouble.

Most firearms related crimes committed in my city involve minorities killing other minorities (black on black violence.) Other than my father my godfather, and a few minority policemen, I didn’t know any black people who carried a firearm in my city. I live in a city with a population of about 14,000 people and an increasing amount of violent crimes and a drug epidemic.

As a young boy, I rarely saw anyone except police, military, or criminals with guns and was taught in school guns kill people. It wasn’t until I became a teenage and my father started to educate and teach me about firearm education, safety, and marksmanship, I knew that school was spinning me an incorrect narrative. In high school, I joined the rifle team and continued learning marksmanship. The rifle team furthered my firearm training but I also learned that there was a lot about shooting I still didn’t know. I found out that in the urban high school I attended, the vast majority of the team never shot a rifle in their life. The suburban teams we played against the majority of the team had been exposed to firearms before joining the team. I realized that minority families were less likely to expose their children to firearms. My school and my community were not educating young minorities about gun safety.

I carry a firearm daily and educate myself on laws. I train consistently and love exploring the firearm culture. I recently brought a precision rifle to start training long range shooting and I plan on going deer hunting for the first time. Since carrying my first handgun, I don’t feel awkward anymore. I just wake up, take a shower, get dressed, put my gun on and head out the door. My conceal handgun has become an extension of me. With the increase in violence and the backwards politics in my city, I fear that people will restrict firearms from law abiding citizens but not restrict the criminals from obtaining firearms. I plan on being a firearm activist and to be a positive influence in the firearm community. I plan on trying to bring gun education to the inter city schools and working with pro gun groups to get young minorities.

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When Should You Pull Your Gun?

When I wake up and begin my day, the last thing that crosses my mind is worrying if I have to use my firearm. I do not live in a very high crime area of town nor do I venture to more high crime areas. I occasionally frequent bars or lounges but since carrying a firearm, I try not to venture to areas where there is a higher probability of confrontation. As gun owners, when the time arises when we are out and things go from casual to downhill, we must determine when to use our firearm and when not to and at times this can be hard to determine. It’s not always a black and white situation as I myself have had to make quick thought out decisions when it came to using my firearm.

I recently went to Ohio with my girlfriend for her cousin’s birthday party. I live in Pennsylvania, and before leaving for Ohio I researched and studied the firearm laws for conceal carry in Ohio. In 2015, any out-of-state concealed carry permit holder became recognized in Ohio. So before venturing to the Buckeye state, I happily included my handgun and a couple speed loaders with me on my trip.

We attended the party and everyone was drinking and having a good time. There were approximately seventy people at the birthday party. It was located in a quiet suburban area. I was an outsider but conversed with my girlfriend’s family and friends. As the party dipped into the evening hours I noticed two drunk men at the party start to argue with each other. One of the guys shovel the other into a fridge and soon people started to separate the individuals. The argument continued out into the street of the suburban neighborhood. The guy who was shoveled pulled a knife out and made a threat to stab the individual who pushed him. My girlfriend and I are about 200 yards away from the altercation and she suggested that I go over there and try to deescalate the situation. I replied that I’m not getting involved because my life nor her life was not in immediate danger. I told her to call the police and it is their job to get involved and keep the peace. As we walked back to the car to leave, I heard someone cock back the slide of a gun and saw some more people head over to the conflict.

The guy with the knife fled but eventually he called the police. The police eventually arrested him and ended the party. No one was injured. On our way back to the hotel that night, I explained to my girlfriend that if I would have pulled my gun out, I could have been arrested and been in legal trouble trying to deescalate the situation. I told her that carrying a firearm isn’t about saving the day, it’s a responsibility. Often times you have to make a judgment call. The situation might have been different if he had someone at knife point, went on a stabbing rampage, or was threatening my or her immediate safety. But I was in no way in danger. I was always taught to use your firearm as a last resort when you cannot escape. I had an out and I took it. I got away from the danger. As a gun owner, I hope I never have to pull my firearm out for a self defense situation. In the case I have to, I want to be justified in my decision to use it.

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Ray Price: For My Concealed Carry Sisters

Recently my sister approached me and asked me what I thought about her getting her concealed carry permit. Naturally I told her it was a great idea and that she was among many people especially woman obtaining their permit recently. She then asked me the following questions as it pertains to a woman who wants to conceal carry.

“What would be advice they you would offer a woman who was interested in carrying a handgun for self defense?” I would first ask her why she has become interested in carrying a firearm? I would then want to know what experiences she has had with firearms and any training she has had. I would explain to her or anyone who was interested in carrying a handgun that they look into educating themselves on the laws and seek proper training.

“What firearm would you advise a woman to buy for conceal carry?” There are many options for conceal carry. It depends on her experience and what she feels comfortable with. I would advise any woman interested in owning a handgun to journey to their local firearms store and ask to handle the most popular handguns for conceal carry.

“What carry options are available for women?” The same carry options that men have available to them, women have, and more. There are manufacturers making clothing and holsters specifically for women to conceal carry. Conceal carry is about how well you can hide your firearm and it comes down to the holster and clothing; that goes for anyone.

“Would you consider carrying in a purse?” Well…I carry to work with me everyday a messenger bag. My dress attire for work is dress pants and a dress shirt tucked into my pants. When the weather is nice enough without having to wear a jacket, I sometimes off the body carry and place my handgun in a pocket in my bag easily accessible to me. I think there will be times that a woman will have to carry their handgun in a purse, but she should think this method of carry out to be able to quickly access her firearm when needed and also be mindful where she keeps her purse. If she doesn’t have her purse, then she doesn’t have her firearm. I do not like off the body carry but sometimes you might have too depending on the situation. Research other carry options to carry on the body if possible.

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The Right Fit

My experience in concealed carrying firearms has taught me that not one gun fits all. Just as we all don’t wear the same shoes, what I might like or carry might not be right for you. Below I provide tips on how to find the right firearm for concealed firearm for you.

 

1. Feel. One of the best ways to find a firearm for concealed carry is to actually handle the gun. Remember this will be the gun you train with and learn how to become a proficient marksman. How does it feel in your hand? Can you operate the controls such as the safety and rack the slide back? How does the trigger pull feel? I recommend visiting your local firearm store and ask to handle various firearms to get a feel for what you like.

 

2. Research. Start reading some trusted firearm magazine articles, search the Internet for gun reviews, and ask people about particular first hand experiences with firearms for concealed carry.

 

3.Holster. A great holster and belt will make it more comfortable to carry a firearm on your waist. Are holsters easily available for the particular firearm you are interested in? What type of holster do you plan on wearing (inside the pants, ankle holster, shoulder holster, etc.?)

 

4. Dress. Your dress will affect how you carry your firearm. You might have to redo or make alterations to your wardrobe in order to carry properly. Tighter clothes are harder to conceal and carry a firearm. Evaluate your wardrobe; there are multiple companies that manufacture lines of clothing for conceal carry.

From my personal experience and opinion, when considering what to buy — consider a compact or subcompact pistol that feels comfortable in your hand and you feel comfortable manipulating the functions. I would recommend some type of safety features. Ensure that you are easily able to dissemble and reassemble. I have fired and carried multiple handguns from a variety of manufacturers and many of them have great options for concealed carry.

For those of you that are concealed carry veterans I would love to know what your first firearm you purchased was and for any new comers feel free to ask any questions.

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