Why Does This Black Person Want An AR-15?

On this episode of the Black Man With A Gun Show Podcast #560

My Country Tis of Thee…

What Happened on YouTube – Michael j. Woodland interviews Hank Strange

Which gun organization should you join?

Why Would This Black Man Want An AR-15?

For the record, I’ve been African American, Black not Hispanic most of my life. Before that I was Colored, Negro, and Afro- American. I’m over 50 so I have weathered the social and cultural storm. I am not confused.

I’ve been there done that, and got the scars to prove it.

Also, the title of this post and podcast is to bring attention to the foolishness which has become our normal. Some of you will get that later.

If you are still reading, let me share some stuff with you that is true and factual. Some information about gun control, deliberate misinformation, and fear based hypocrisy regarding a mechanical device called the AR-15. I have one and want to share why I “aint scared.”

The Armalite Rifle (AR-15) is the subject of debate, hysteria and fearmongering since a murderer used one in Parkland, Florida. Over the past twenty-five years of my tenure in the gun community I have seen and heard this argument over and over again. The laws that are proposed only affect the innocent, and the law abiding gun owner. The Public Safety and Recreational Firearms Act (the Federal Assault Weapons Ban) was enacted as part of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 to 2004 it did not work. The AWB did not prevent the 1999 Columbine massacre either. Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold killed 13 people at a high school in Colorado, carrying two illegal sawed-off shotguns as well as a Hi-Point 995 carbine and Tec-DC9 pistol.

The bill was originally written by Vice President Joe Biden—then a Senator—no crime bill before or after was bigger. Inside the 356-page bill is the Assault Weapons Ban (AWB), which banned any new manufacture of semiautomatic rifles that accept a detachable magazine and had two additional cosmetic features from this list:

· Folding or collapsible stock
· Pistol grip
· Bayonet mount
· Flash suppressor or threaded barrel
· Grenade launcher mount

Along with the firearms ban was the stop to any new manufacture of magazines capable of holding more than 10 rounds. The AWB’s intention was to stop mass shootings and lower homicide rates of law enforcement officers.

Remember Sandy Hook? Some anti rights folks, claim the assault weapons ban would have prevented Adam Lanza from obtaining the firearm he used. However, during the time of the shooting, Connecticut had its own assault weapons ban in effect. The alleged Bushmaster Lanza stole from his mother was legally purchased and owned in Connecticut.

The AR-15 was developed in the late 1950s as a civilian weapon by Eugene Stoner, a former Marine working for small California startup called ArmaLite (which is where the AR comes from). The gun, revolutionary for its light weight, easy care and adaptability with additional components, entered the mainstream in the mid-1960s, after Colt bought the patent and developed an automatic-fire version for troops in Vietnam, called the M16. I had a M16A1 in 1980 in MCRD Parris Island.

Why is it good?

The AR is a lightweight, magazine-fed, gas-operated semi-automatic rifle. It was designed to be manufactured with the extensive use of aluminum alloys and synthetic materials. They can be chambered in .22, .223 (5.56 x 45mm), 6.8 SPC, .308, .450 Bushmaster and about a dozen others. Upper receivers for pistol calibers such as 9 mm, .40, and .45 are available. There are even .410 shotgun versions.

These rifles are used for many different types of hunting, from varmint to big game. And they’re used for target shooting in the national matches. AR-15-style rifles are no more powerful than other hunting rifles of the same caliber and in most cases are chambered in calibers less powerful than common big-game hunting cartridges like the 30-06 Springfield and .300 Win. Mag. The AR-15 platform is modular. Owners like being able to affix different “uppers” (the barrel and chamber) to the “lower” (the grip, stock).

This is why some people compare the AR-15 to a car chassis, others to Legos or Mr. Potato Head. It is relatively easy to take it apart, reassemble it and modify it ─ including changes to the caliber of ammunition it fires. Pushing the gun’s “takedown pins” with his fingers, he broke his gun down into its basic components, and within several seconds snapped it back together.

Building an AR-15 at home often begins with buying a “lower receiver,” the only part with a serial number and that requires a federal background check. The rest of the core parts are available online. Then there is a seemingly endless array of accessories: barrels, grips, stocks, rails, magazines and scopes.

Everything about the AR-15 platform can be changed to fit the specific end user and their intended use. Long range shooters might add a longer barrel and big scope to the gun for increased accuracy. Those interested in home defense might choose a shorter barrel and add a flashlight to the gun. You can even change the grip to fit your hand exactly and make shooting more comfortable.

Hundreds of thousands of new hunters use the AR-15 platform (which is often sold in complete configurations specifically designed for hunting). The gun is rugged, reliable, portable and accurate. What’s more, the ability to quickly and easily change the rifle’s caliber offers American hunters a huge advantage.

Before the AR-15 rifle made its way onto the market gun owners needed to buy a different gun for each caliber and application.

Shooters were also stuck with their rifle’s ergonomics. If the stock was too long or too short there wasn’t much they could do—except pay a gunsmith to modify the gun. The same was true if you didn’t like the rifle’s trigger or the sights. Changing anything was a major pain in the butt.

For self-defense the AR-15 is an easy-to-use and effective rifle for self-defense, both at close and distant ranges. It’s also the reason the police rely on AR-15s to counter active shooters.

Since the 19th century, civilian sporting rifles have evolved from their military predecessors. The modern sporting rifle simply follows that tradition.

Misconceptions from the ‘hood.

AR-15-style rifles are NOT “assault weapons” or “assault rifles.” An assault rifle is fully automatic — a machine gun. Automatic firearms have been severely restricted from civilian ownership since 1934.

FYI: The M16 was not the original so called assault rifle, the German created at in WWII with a rifle called the Sturmgewehr 44 or STG 44.

Re-naming AR-15’s “assault rifles” is comparable to how folks named health care legislation (Obama Care) the “Affordable Care Act”.

Versions of modern sporting rifles are legal to own in all 50 states, provided the purchaser passes the mandatory FBI background check required for all retail firearm purchasers.

1. Owning a rifle does not equal murder.
2. Owning a rifle does not mean I am evil.
3. Owning a rifle does not mean I don’t have faith in God.

I am a steward of everything God has given me. He has given me the ability to get training, knowledge, and learn how to be safe, accurate and secure as a person. With this I can protect others and have fun with this device.

Shooting these rifles is fun.

The skill required to shoot accurately past one hundred yards is no joke.



Being in the gun community, being an advocate for 20 plus years is starting to really pay off for me. I got a chance to visit the LWRCI shop in Cambridge, Maryland last summer. I had a ball. What made it for me was that it was in the town on Harriet Tubman. It was in a formerly poor part of the Eastern Shore. The folks there have a choice of either farming, working for Frank Purdue in the chicken realm, or become skilled craftspersons at a machine shop that makes high performance rifles. I saw old ladies, old dudes, young people cranking out, finishing, polishing, engraving, cutting, sanding, and building beautiful works of art that you can shoot.

Some people collect rifles for nostalgia. It reminds them of a movie, a war, a time period. For me it is to support my state, one of the most un gun friendly states in the union and the people that work for LWRCI.

Can I tell you about this rifle? (seen in the picture)

The LWRCI™ Di is made with the same craftsmanship and design excellence that comes with every LWRCI™ firearm. I have seen the African American hands that put these together. It’s built from the ground up to be more than just another direct impingement rifle, the LWRCI™ Di delivers the quality every rifle enthusiast demands with innovation that’s expected from LWRCI™. It has a “keyless” bolt carried design, combined with an operating system . It has an ambidextrous lower receiver is compatible with the rest of our IC family, you can upgrade your Di to our flagship, piston-driven IC just by switching out the upper.







BARREL 16.1” [40.9cm]

WEIGHT 6.6lbs [2.9kg]

O/A LENGTH 32″-35.25″ [81.3-89.5cm]



How these guns work.

The bolt carrier acts as a movable cylinder and the bolt itself acts as a stationary piston. This mechanism is often called “direct gas impingement” (DGI), although it differs from prior gas systems. Designer Eugene Stoner did not consider the AR-15 to be a conventional direct impingement mechanism, but that is how it came to be characterized.[4]

Gas is tapped from the barrel as the bullet moves past a gas port located above the rifle’s front sight base. The gas expands into the port and down a gas tube, located above the barrel that runs from the front sight base into the AR-15’s upper receiver. Here, the gas tube protrudes into a “gas key” (bolt carrier key), which accepts the gas and funnels it into the bolt carrier.

At this point, the bolt is locked into the barrel extension by locking lugs, so the expanding gas forces the bolt carrier backward a short distance. As the bolt carrier moves toward the butt of the gun, the bolt cam pin, riding in a slot on the bolt carrier, forces the bolt to rotate and thus unlocks it from the barrel extension. Once the bolt is fully unlocked it begins its rearward movement along with the bolt carrier. The bolt’s rearward motion extracts the empty cartridge case from the chamber. As soon as the neck of the case clears the barrel extension, the bolt’s spring-loaded ejector forces it out the ejection port in the side of the upper receiver.

Behind the bolt carrier is a plastic or metal buffer, which rests in line with a return spring. The buffer spring begins to push the bolt carrier and bolt back toward the chamber once it is

Being into guns is not a strange weird thing people have been hunting with long guns for centuries, collecting, passing them on as heirlooms, investing in them.

Shooting is an internationally recognized Olympic sport.

Having a gun makes you better able to defend your family.

If gun ownership one day is made illegal, criminals won’t turn in their guns. Gun control makes easy prey out of law-abiding citizens. The police can’t come to help you until AFTER a crime has been committed. Having a gun may enable you to stay alive long enough to call for help from the police. Our courts regularly return violent criminals to the streets to do their crimes again.

Guns in the home are safe, when gun owners keep guns responsibly. More children die every year in swimming pool accidents than in gun accidents.

It is a fact that armed American men and women prevent two million crimes every year with their guns.

Self-defense is more honorable and better for society than being a victim. It is up to YOU to act responsibly for your own safety, and the safety of your family.

It is true that cities which impose strict gun control create the highest assault and murder rates in America.

The most violent cities involve gang members that shoot other gang members. The average gun owner never uses his or her gun to commit a crime.

Most states issue permits to carry concealed handguns. Men and women who get permits take gun safety classes, and have extensive criminal background checks.

These people make everyone a little safer, wherever they may be.

Imagine walking out to a outdoor range where the sky is blue and the grass is green like a golf course. You can’t even see the target without binoculars or the scope on your rifle. But if you are old school like me, you are using iron sights. The Zen of shooting is the ability to decompress, block out the troubles of the day, concentrate on your breathing, marksmanship skills and the abilities of the rifle you probably put together. Your goal is to hit a target accurately and continuously a foot ball field away.

The Japanese had bows or swords, we now have the AR15. It is the same art really, just a different choice of weapon but the mind game is the same – getting rid of “mind” so that one can just hit the target naturally. It’s a Zen thing.

If you still don’t get it after everything I said, then maybe you are not someone I would want around me or my family. Just saying…

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As you probably already know, the Black Man With A Gun website recently experienced what you might call a “catastrophic event.” Kenn has successfully recovered some of the content, but much was lost for good, including over five years of my writing. As you might expect, my first, knee-jerk reaction was…well, unprintable here. But I have learned over the years that the old adage about crying over spilled milk is true…and that time spent lamenting what cannot be undone is also time wasted.

So I am embracing this “reboot” as an opportunity for a fresh start. And in the spirit of that fresh start, I have a confession to make. For those of you who are unaware, you should know that I…Dave Cole…am not black. In fact, I am as white as they come. Most of my ancestors came here from Scotland, England, and Germany shortly after the Mayflower landed, and we’ve been here ever since. I spent almost the first half of my life in East Tennessee, before serving in Texas, Canada, Saudi Arabia, and Korea with the United States Army for nine years as an Air Defense Artillery officer. Then I got out and moved to Northern Kentucky near Cincinnati, where I have worked in both private industry and as a police officer.

Not black.

Then early in 2012, I was listening to Kenn’s Black Man With A Gun podcast when he asked if there were any writers out there who might like to contribute to his website. I’ve always liked to use the written word as my own personal outlet, and I had some stuff I’d already written handy…so I sent it to Kenn. He emailed me back inside of an hour asking, “Can I go ahead and start posting this material?” I said “Sure,” and the rest is history.

But today…Martin Luther King Day…what is even more important to note is what Kenn Blanchard did not ask me. Before accepting my writing to post on the Black Man With A Gun website, he did not ask me what color my skin was. He simply read my writing, and judged whether it was good or not, regardless of the color of the person that it came from.

Isn’t that what Martin Luther King was talking about? Isn’t that exactly the way he would have wanted us to treat each other? Rather than focusing on our differences, Black Man With A Gun is a place where we focus on our commonalities…a love of guns, shooting, and liberty. I’m personally quite proud to be a part of this team, and excited to reboot into 2018 with all of you.

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Product Review: Copperbasin Takedown Backpack

When considering a bag to transport your rifle to and from the range, you really need to consider your surroundings.  When I go to Academy or Bass Pro there’s no end to the number of tactical bags available, but what if I’m transporting my rifle from my car to my place of business do I want to advertise to the world that I’m carrying a rifle?  I’d think not.  So, it’s through that lens I’m considering the Copperbasin Takedown Backpackblackmanwithagun.com Merrell Ligons

If you’re looking for an aggressive looking tactical bag that strokes your ego and makes you feel more like a manly man then this probably isn’t the style bag for you.  If you’re comfortable in your manhood, and like me live and work in the city where you’re surrounded by others that may not be as comfortable around guns, then you should consider the Copperbasin Takedown Backpack.

I was pleasantly surprised when the bag showed up, the thoughtful design and the quality construction was apparent.  You can get the specs on the Copperbasin Website so I won’t get into those but let me talk just a minute about my thoughts on how well the bag is built.  I spend a fair amount of time in the woods and have a number of bags from multi-day backpacking bags to quality day-packs and I’m a stickler about quality construction when it comes to bags.

The first thing I noticed was the use of quality nylon for the main bag body, I tend to be tough on bags and keep them for a long time (if they hold up).  I feel that this bag will get the job done for many years to come.  The main zippers are big and rugged, there’s nothing more frustrating than a manufacturer who invests in quality material only to included cheap zippers on the final product.  The bottom on the bag is reinforced with a tough vinyl type of martial, so as you’re packing and unpacking your bag overtime it won’t wear holes through the bottom.

Copperbasin includes quality buckles (which I’m a stickler about) which are a must, especially if you live in a colder climate where the cold can make the buckles brittle.

Storage…storage…storage is what this bag offers.  You can easily get your rifle, magazines, cleaning supplies, tools and ammunition to the range and still have both hands free to bring more toys along with you.  The compartments for your rifle and accessories are lined with a fleece material which helps to keep your weapon free from any dirt or other debris that may scratch the finish on your rifle.  The compartment for your rifle and barrel have adjustable straps to keep everything safe and secure.

Merrell Ligons for blackmanwithagun.com

For those like myself that tend to have a lot of gear already in the truck there is a seat mount to give you more carrying options.  The only problem with the design is that if you don’t have adjustable head rests the strap may not be long enough to get around the fixed head rest design.  I have a 2006 Ford F350, as you can see from the picture my headrest is not adjustable so the strap doesn’t work for me.  A bummer but not a deal breaker by any means, because the bag is slim it easily fits between the front and rear seat or just about anywhere else.

All-in-all the Copperbasin Takedown Backpack really opened my eyes to the reality of being a gun owner in an urban environment.  If you don’t want to draw attention to the fact that you’re carrying a weapon to and from your vehicle, home, or job then you need to reconsider tactical style bags and think about a bag like the Copperbasin Takedown Backpack that does a much better job at blending into the urban landscape.



Merrell Ligons
Is Publisher of Outdoors In Color, which he founded in 2016 and outdoors contributor to blackmanwithagun.com. When he’s not with his family you’ll most likely find him out at the lake or stalking hogs in the woods.



Editors note:

Special thanks to CopperBasin for letting us review this great bag.  Thanks and congratulations to Merrell Ligons for the review, and on his recent nuptials.



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